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Quotations About / On: ROSE

  • 11.
    The sun goes away at night and leaves you your sorrows, and it does not rise any quicker when you are joyful.
    (Simone Schwarz-Bart (b. 1938), Gaudeloupean author. The Bridge of Beyond, p. 114, Éditions du Seuil (1972).)
    More quotations from: Simone Schwarz-Bart, sun, night
  • 12.
    The sun never gets tired of rising but sometimes a person gets tired of being under the sun.
    (Simone Schwarz-Bart (b. 1938), Gaudeloupean author. The Bridge of Beyond, p. 166, Éditions du Seuil (1972).)
    More quotations from: Simone Schwarz-Bart, sun, sometimes
  • 13.
    May not the complaint, that common people are above their station, often take its rise in the fact of uncommon people being below theirs?
    (Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Nicholas Nickleby, ch. 17, 213 (1839).)
    More quotations from: Charles Dickens, people
  • 14.
    I've always felt that complement of opposites: body and soul, solitude and companionship, and in the dance studio, contraction and release, rise and fall.
    (Judith Jamison (b. 1943), African American dancer. Dancing Spirit, ch. 1 (1993).)
    More quotations from: Judith Jamison, solitude, dance
  • 15.
    The sole art that suits me is that which, rising from unrest, tends toward serenity.
    (André Gide (1869-1951), French author. Journals 1889-1949, entry for November 23, 1940, ed. Justin O'Brien (1951).)
    More quotations from: André Gide
  • 16.
    So long as men worship the Caesars and Napoleons, Caesars and Napoleons will duly rise and make them miserable.
    (Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. Ends and Means, ch. 8 (1937).)
    More quotations from: Aldous Huxley
  • 17.
    Wisdom is that apprehension of heavenly things to which the spirit rises through love.
    (Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. It later entered the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971). Seraphita, chapter III, First published as part of Romans et contes philosophiques (1831), then the Etudes philosophiques (1835). Explanation of Swedenborg's philosophy.)
    More quotations from: Honoré De Balzac, love
  • 18.
    Heavy, heavy-hearted people grow lighter and rise occasionally to their surface through precisely that which makes others heavier, through hatred and love.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 5, p. 89, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Beyond Good and Evil, "Fourth Part: Maxims and Interludes," section 90 (1886).)
    More quotations from: Friedrich Nietzsche, people, love
  • 19.
    If, as a feminist leader, I try to help out the career of a rising woman faculty leader—I'm sleeping with her.
    (Theo J. Kalikow (b. 1941), U.S. educator. As quoted in the Chronicle of Higher Education, p. A16 (June 16, 1993). The interim president of Plymouth State College (New Hampshire) was remarking on the tendency toward unfounded speculation in academia about feminists', and women college presidents', sexual orientation and behavior.)
    More quotations from: Theo J Kalikow, woman
  • 20.
    In a hierarchy every employee tends to rise to his level of incompetence.
    (Laurence J. Peter (1919-1990), U.S. Canadian author. The Peter Principle, ch. 1 (1969). The so-called Peter Principle; compare with the Paula Principle: "women stay below their level of competence, because they hold back from promotion." (Liz Filkin, quoted in Observer (London, Oct. 19, 1986)).)
    More quotations from: Laurence J Peter
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