Quotations About / On: ROSE

  • 1.
    It is an hypothesis that the sun will rise tomorrow: and this means that we do not know whether it will rise.
    (Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951), Austrian-British philosopher. Trans. by D.F. Pears and B.F. McGuinness, Routledge and Kegan Paul (1961). Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus, 6.36311.)
    More quotations from: Ludwig Wittgenstein, tomorrow, sun
  • 2.
    The roses you lifted to your lips ... lucky roses!
    (Charlie Chaplin (1889-1977), British actor, screenwriter, director, and Orson Welles. Monsieur Henri Verdoux (Charles Chaplin), Monsieur Verdoux, said to Marie Grosnay (Isobel Elsom) as he tries to seduce her (1947).)
    More quotations from: Charlie Chaplin
  • 3.
    The best way to rise in society is to use all possible means of persuading people that one has already risen in society.
    (François, Duc De La Rochefoucauld (1613-1680), French writer, moralist. repr. F.A. Stokes Co., New York (c. 1930). Moral Maxims and Reflections, no. 57 (1665-1678), trans. London (1706).)
  • 4.
    We fight, get beat, rise, and fight again.
    (Nathanael Greene (1742-1786), U.S. Revolutionary general. Letter, April 1781. To French ambassador to the United States Chevalier del la Luzerne, following the Battle of Hobkirk's Hill, S.C..)
    More quotations from: Nathanael Greene
  • 5.
    You can't make a souffle rise twice.
    (Alice Roosevelt Longworth (1884-1980), U.S. socialite; daughter of President Theodore Roosevelt. As quoted in A Dictionary of Contemporary American History, by Stanley Hochman and Eleanor Hochman (1993). Said in 1948 on the defeat of Republican Thomas H. Dewey in that year's Presidential election, by incumbent President Harry S. Truman. In 1944, Dewey had been defeated by Longworth's kinsman, Franklin Delano Roosevelt.)
    More quotations from: Alice Roosevelt Longworth
  • 6.
    Slow rises worth, by poverty depressed:
    (Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British writer. Poverty in London (l. 177). . . Oxford Book of English Verse. Sir Arthur Quille, ed. (1948) Oxford University Press.)
    More quotations from: Samuel Johnson, poverty
  • 7.
    The younger rises when the old doth fall.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Edmund, in King Lear, act 3, sc. 3, l. 25. Varying the proverb, "the rising of one man is the falling of another.")
    More quotations from: William Shakespeare
  • 8.
    So long as men worship the Caesars and Napoleons, Caesars and Napoleons will duly rise and make them miserable.
    (Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. Ends and Means, ch. 8 (1937).)
    More quotations from: Aldous Huxley
  • 9.
    Wisdom is that apprehension of heavenly things to which the spirit rises through love.
    (Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. It later entered the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971). Seraphita, chapter III, First published as part of Romans et contes philosophiques (1831), then the Etudes philosophiques (1835). Explanation of Swedenborg's philosophy.)
    More quotations from: Honoré De Balzac, love
  • 10.
    Heavy, heavy-hearted people grow lighter and rise occasionally to their surface through precisely that which makes others heavier, through hatred and love.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 5, p. 89, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Beyond Good and Evil, "Fourth Part: Maxims and Interludes," section 90 (1886).)
    More quotations from: Friedrich Nietzsche, people, love
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