Quotations About / On: ROSE

  • 1.
    A rose is not a rose until it bloom's.
    (is it poetry)
    More quotations from: Is It Poetry
  • 2.
    In falls we rise but in rise we fall.
    (If one learns from one's mistakes, one can become the greatest of men. However, after success, if one becomes too proud, one's downfall is destined.)
    More quotations from: Navarun Mallick
  • 3.
    The roses you lifted to your lips ... lucky roses!
    (Charlie Chaplin (1889-1977), British actor, screenwriter, director, and Orson Welles. Monsieur Henri Verdoux (Charles Chaplin), Monsieur Verdoux, said to Marie Grosnay (Isobel Elsom) as he tries to seduce her (1947).)
    More quotations from: Charlie Chaplin
  • 4.
    There's always a fall before a rise. If you rise without falling, you better watch your back.
    (Victor Cruickshank)
    More quotations from: Victor Cruickshank
  • 5.
    “The best things and best people rise out of their separateness; Im against a homogenized society because I want the cream to rise.”
    ()
    More quotations from: Robert Frost
  • 6.
    A rose for a rose! With the pose of a prose.
    (Prose)
    More quotations from: Edward Kofi Louis
  • 7.
    It is an hypothesis that the sun will rise tomorrow: and this means that we do not know whether it will rise.
    (Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951), Austrian-British philosopher. Trans. by D.F. Pears and B.F. McGuinness, Routledge and Kegan Paul (1961). Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus, 6.36311.)
    More quotations from: Ludwig Wittgenstein, tomorrow, sun
  • 8.
    Man will rise, if God by exception lends him a hand; he will rise by abandoning and renouncing his own means, and letting himself be raised and uplifted by purely celestial means.
    (Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Apology For Raymond Sebond," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. II, ch. 12, Simon Millanges, Bordeaux, first edition (1580).)
    More quotations from: Michel de Montaigne, god
  • 9.
    The best way to rise in society is to use all possible means of persuading people that one has already risen in society.
    (François, Duc De La Rochefoucauld (1613-1680), French writer, moralist. repr. F.A. Stokes Co., New York (c. 1930). Moral Maxims and Reflections, no. 57 (1665-1678), trans. London (1706).)
  • 10.
    That the sun will not rise to-morrow is no less intelligible a proposition, and implies no more contradiction, than the affirmation, that it will rise.
    (David Hume (1711-1776), Scottish philosopher. Enquiries Concerning the Human Understanding and Concerning the Principles of Morals, sect. 4 ("Sceptical Doubts Concerning the Operations of the Understanding"), part 1, p. 25, ed. L. Selby-Bigge, M.A., London, Oxford University Press (1902). From "An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding.")
    More quotations from: David Hume, sun
[Report Error]