Quotations About / On: ROMANTIC

  • 1.
    I'm a romantic—a sentimental person thinks things will last—a romantic person hopes against hope that they won't.
    (F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. Amory Blaine, in This Side of Paradise, bk. 2, ch. 1 (1920).)
    More quotations from: F. Scott Fitzgerald, romantic, hope
  • 2.
    i'm susceptible to the stars in the sky/I'm incurably romantic
    ()
    More quotations from: amitav mazumdar
  • 3.
    Romantics consider common sense vulgar.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Tenth Selection, New York (1992).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley
  • 4.
    A woman will never turn down this man, one who is successful, righteous and romantic.
    (Life)
    More quotations from: devon da poet
  • 5.
    The Enlightenment needs more shadow; the Romantic Movement less.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Fifth Selection, New York (1988).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, romantic
  • 6.
    The etiquette of romantic love is as elaborate as that surrounding the Emperor of China.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Seventh Selection, New York (1990).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, romantic, love
  • 7.
    The essence of romantic love is that wonderful beginning, after which sadness and impossibility may become the rule.
    (Anita Brookner (b. 1938), British novelist, art historian. Rachel, in A Friend From England, ch. 10 (1987). Referring to Michael Sandberg.)
    More quotations from: Anita Brookner, romantic, love
  • 8.
    What Romantic terminology called genius or talent or inspiration is nothing other than finding the right road empirically, following one's nose, taking shortcuts.
    (Italo Calvino (1923-1985), Italian author, critic. lecture, Nov. 1969, Turin. "Cybernetics and Ghosts," The Literature Machine (1987).)
    More quotations from: Italo Calvino, inspiration, romantic
  • 9.
    By all but the pathologically romantic, it is now recognized that this is not the age of the small man.
    (John Kenneth Galbraith (b. 1908), U.S. economist. The New Industrial State, ch. 3 (1967).)
    More quotations from: John Kenneth Galbraith, romantic
  • 10.
    Classical and romantic: private language of a family quarrel, a dead dispute over the distribution of emphasis between man and nature.
    (Cyril Connolly (1903-1974), British critic. The Unquiet Grave, pt. 3 (1944, rev. 1951).)
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