Quotations About / On: RIVER

  • 31.
    Necessity makes women very weak or very strong, and pent-up rivers are sometimes dangerous. Look to it!
    (Mary Worthington, U.S. women's magazine contributor. The Lily, p. 183 ( November 1856). The first feminist journal in the United States, the magazine was edited by Amelia Jenks Bloomer (1818-1894) in Seneca Falls, N.Y., for the majority of its 1849-1858 run.)
    More quotations from: Mary Worthington, sometimes, women
  • 32.
    You could not step twice into the same rivers; for other waters are ever flowing on to you.
    (Heraclitus (c. 535-475 B.C.), Greek philosopher. quoted in Hippocrates, On The Universe, aph. 41.)
    More quotations from: Heraclitus
  • 33.
    A reaction: a boat which is going against the current but which does not prevent the river from flowing on.
    (Victor Hugo (1802-1885), French poet, novelist, playwright, essayist. Trans. by Lorenzo O'Rourke. "Thoughts," Postscriptum de ma vie, in Victor Hugo's Intellectual Autobiography, Funk and Wagnalls (1907).)
    More quotations from: Victor Hugo, river
  • 34.
    I am an intelligent river which has reflected successively all the banks before which it has flowed by meditating only on the images offered by those changing shores.
    (Victor Hugo (1802-1885), French poet, novelist, playwright, essayist. Trans. by William G. Allen. Les Feuilles d'automne, preface (1831).)
    More quotations from: Victor Hugo, river
  • 35.
    Certainly fame is like a river, that beareth up things light and swoln, and drowns things weighty and solid.
    (Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, statesman. "Of Praise," The Essayes or Counsels (1625).)
    More quotations from: Francis Bacon, fame, river, light
  • 36.
    If it were not for the rivers (and he might go round their heads), a squirrel could here travel thus the whole breadth of the country.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Chesuncook" (1858) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 169, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, travel
  • 37.
    The whole tree itself is but one leaf, and rivers are still vaster leaves whose pulp is intervening earth, and towns and cities are the ova of insects in their axils.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 338, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, tree
  • 38.
    Life is but a river, like a river it drowns. You either swim in it or flow with it, whatever you do, just the head above the water is the conclusion of all matters.
    (Chris'N' John)
    More quotations from: Chris Ajiduah
  • 39.
    Staying on the ground, if you think you can walk on the river, it will be a foolish work. First you must find a bridge to stand there. Then start walking on the river.
    (One shouldn't think foolish.)
    More quotations from: Prodip Kumar
  • 40.
    There is Bengal, and Bihar, Barakor river is in the middle of them; so strange, so profound! No other river (not even Ganga) has cast so vast a spell on me.
    ()
    More quotations from: Sukanta Bhattacharya
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