Quotations About / On: POVERTY

  • 31.
    The fact is, mental philosophy is very like Poverty, which, you know, begins at home; and indeed, when it goes abroad, it is poverty itself.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, October 6, 1838, to Helen Thoreau, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 26, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, poverty, home
  • 32.
    It is easy enough to say that poverty is no crime. No; if it were men wouldn't be ashamed of it. It is a blunder, though, and is punished as such. A poor man is despised the whole world over.
    (Jerome K. Jerome (1859-1927), British author. "On Being Hard Up," Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow (1889).)
    More quotations from: Jerome K Jerome, poverty, world
  • 33.
    Success is somebody else's failure. Success is the American Dream we can keep dreaming because most people in most places, including thirty million of ourselves, live wide awake in the terrible reality of poverty.
    (Ursula K. Le Guin (b. 1929), U.S. author. "A Left-Handed Commencement Address," Dancing at the Edge of the World (1989). Speech, 1983, to Mills College.)
  • 34.
    For as the interposition of a rivulet, however small, will occasion the line of the phalanx to fluctuate, so any trifling disagreement will be the cause of seditions; but they will not so soon flow from anything else as from the disagreement between virtue and vice, and next to that between poverty and riches.
    (Aristotle (384-322 B.C.), Greek philosopher. Politics, bk. 5, ch. 3, sct. 1303b (c. 343 B.C.).)
    More quotations from: Aristotle, poverty
  • 35.
    I have no desire for riches. Honest poverty and a conscience torpid through virtuous inaction are more to me than corner lots and praise.
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. 1881. "A Cat Tale," p. 769, Mark Twain: Collected Tales, Sketches, Speeches, & Essays, 1852-1890, Library of America (1992).)
  • 36.
    ... what's been building since the 1980's is a new kind of social Darwinism that blames poverty and crime and the crisis of our youth on a breakdown of the family. That's what will last after this flurry on family values.
    (Stephanie Coontz (b. 1944), U.S. social historian. Chronicle of Higher Education, p. A13 (November 4, 1992). Reacting to recent appeals to "family values" by both the Democratic and the Republican parties' leadership. Coontz specialized in research on the subject of the American family.)
    More quotations from: Stephanie Coontz, family, poverty
  • 37.
    Museums are just a lot of lies, and the people who make art their business are mostly imposters.... We have infected the pictures in museums with all our stupidities, all our mistakes, all our poverty of spirit. We have turned them into petty and ridiculous things.
    (Pablo Picasso (1881-1973), Spanish artist. "Conversation avec Picasso," vol. 10, no. 10, Cahiers d'Art (Paris, 1935), trans. in Alfred H. Barr, Jr., Picasso: Fifty Years of His Art (1946).)
    More quotations from: Pablo Picasso, poverty, people
  • 38.
    The English are probably more capable than most peoples of making revolutionary change without bloodshed. In England, if anywhere, it would be possible to abolish poverty without destroying liberty.
    (George Orwell (1903-1950), British author. repr. in The Collected Essays, Journalism and Letters of George Orwell, vol. 3, eds. Sonia Orwell and Ian Angus (1968). "The English People," (1944).)
    More quotations from: George Orwell, poverty, change
  • 39.
    Poverty is an anomaly to rich people. It is very difficult to make out why people who want dinner do not ring the bell.
    (Walter Bagehot (1826-1877), British economist, critic. (Article originally published 1858). The Waverley Novels, vol. 2, Literary Studies (1878).)
    More quotations from: Walter Bagehot, poverty, people
  • 40.
    What matters poverty? What matters anything to him who is "enamoured" of our art? Does he not carry in himself every joy and every beauty?
    (Sarah Bernhardt (1845-1923), French actor. The Art of the Theatre, ch. 3 (1924). The "art" she spoke of was dramatic theater.)
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