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Quotations About / On: POVERTY

  • 21.
    "It's a wery remarkable circumstance, sir", said Sam, "that poverty and oysters seems to go together."
    (Charles Dickens (1812-1870), British novelist. Sam Weller in The Pickwick Papers, ch. 22, p. 301 (1837).)
    More quotations from: Charles Dickens, poverty, together
  • 22.
    Poverty was an ornament on a learned man like a red ribbon on a white horse.
    (Anzia Yezierska (c. 1881-1970), Polish author. Red Ribbon on a White Horse, ch. 9 (1950). Of Poland, in letter from Boruch Shlomoe Mayer to Anzia Yezierska.)
    More quotations from: Anzia Yezierska, horse, poverty, red
  • 23.
    Literary tradition is full of lies about poverty—the jolly beggar, the poor but happy milkmaid, the wholesome diet of porridge, etc.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Fourth Selection, New York (1987).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, poverty, happy
  • 24.
    Modernized by tin roofs and T-shirts, Third World poverty is no longer picturesque.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, New York (1984).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, poverty, world
  • 25.
    The honest poor can sometimes forget poverty. The honest rich can never forget it.
    (Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "Cockneys and Their Jokes," All Things Considered (1908).)
  • 26.
    He who is not capable of enduring poverty is not capable of being free.
    (Victor Hugo (1802-1885), French poet, novelist, playwright, essayist. Trans. by Lorenzo O'Rourke. "Thoughts," Postscriptum de ma vie, in Victor Hugo's Intellectual Autobiography, Funk and Wagnalls (1907).)
    More quotations from: Victor Hugo, poverty
  • 27.
    In going to America one learns that poverty is not a necessary accompaniment to civilisation.
    (Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lecture, July 10, 1883. "Personal Impressions of America.")
    More quotations from: Oscar Wilde, poverty, america
  • 28.
    The poverty from which I have suffered could be diagnosed as "Soho" poverty. It comes from having the airs and graces of a genius and no talent.
    (Quentin Crisp (b. 1908), British author. The Naked Civil Servant, ch. 7 (1968).)
    More quotations from: Quentin Crisp, poverty
  • 29.
    Poverty is relative, and the lack of food and of the necessities of life is not necessarily a hardship. Spiritual and social ostracism, the invasion of your privacy, are what constitute the pain of poverty.
    (Alice Foote MacDougall (1867-1945), U.S. businesswoman. The Autobiography of a Business Woman, ch. 7 (1928). Before making a great success in the restaurant and wholesale beverage businesses, MacDougall and her three children had been thrust into deep poverty by her husband's financial failure. Raised in wealth and high social standing, she had been forced to ask relatives for help and was humiliated by their presumptuous inquiries about her life style and expenditures.)
  • 30.
    Poverty in itself does not make men into a rabble; a rabble is created only when there is joined to poverty a disposition of mind, an inner indignation against the rich, against society, against the government.
    (Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831), German philosopher. "The State," addition 149, The Philosophy of Right (1821, trans. 1942).)
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