Quotations About / On: MUSIC

  • 41.
    Music proposes. Sound disposes.
    (Babette Deutsch (1895-1982), U.S. poet. "Electronic Concert," line 1 (1969).)
    More quotations from: Babette Deutsch, music
  • 42.
    Today, music heralds ... the establishment of a society of repetition in which nothing will happen anymore.
    (Jacques Attali (b. 1943), Algerian-born French economist, writer. Noise: The Political Economy of Music, ch. 1 (1977).)
    More quotations from: Jacques Attali, music, today
  • 43.
    When you are listening to music it is better to cover your eyes than your ears.
    (José Bergamín (1895-1983), Spanish writer. El cohete y la estrella (The Rocket and the Star), p. 42, Madrid, Biblioteca de Indice (1923).)
    More quotations from: José Bergamín, music
  • 44.
    Your remark that clams will lie quiet if music be played to them, was superfluous—entirely superfluous.
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. 1870. The regular editor, in "How I Edited an Agricultural Newspaper," p. 415, Mark Twain: Collected Tales, Sketches, Speeches, & Essays, 1852-1890, Library of America (1992).)
  • 45.
    Hell is full of musical amateurs: music is the brandy of the damned.
    (George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950), Anglo-Irish playwright, critic. Don Juan, in Man and Superman, act 3.)
    More quotations from: George Bernard Shaw, music
  • 46.
    "Beer, tobacco, and music," he went on. "Behold the Fatherland."
    (Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. Originally published as Der Zauberberg, Fischer (1924). The Magic Mountain, ch. 4, p. 112, trans. by Helen T. Lowe-Porter, The Modern Library, McGraw-Hill (1955). Settembrini's characterization of Germany.)
    More quotations from: Thomas Mann, music
  • 47.
    It is a wise tune that knows its own father, and I like my music to be the legitimate offspring of respectable parents.
    (Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 237 (1951).)
    More quotations from: Samuel Butler, music, father
  • 48.
    There is nothing stable in the world; uproar's your only music.
    (John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Jan. 13-19, 1818, to his brothers George and Thomas Keats. Letters of John Keats, no. 37, ed. Frederick Page (1954).)
    More quotations from: John Keats, music, world
  • 49.
    Who that has heard a strain of music feared then lest he should speak extravagantly any more forever?
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 357, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, forever, music
  • 50.
    Nothing is capable of being well set to music that is not nonsense.
    (Joseph Addison (1672-1719), British essayist. Spectator (London, March 21, 1711), no. 18. On the effect of Italian opera on the English stage.)
    More quotations from: Joseph Addison, music
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