Quotations About / On: MURDER

  • 41.
    Men will confess to treason, murder, arson, false teeth, or a wig. How many of them will own up to a lack of humor?
    (Frank Moore Colby (1865-1925), U.S. editor, essayist. "Satire and Teeth," vol. 1, The Colby Essays (1926).)
    More quotations from: Frank Moore Colby, humor, murder
  • 42.
    It's a pity you didn't know when you started your game of murder, that I was playing, too.
    (Robb White, and William Castle. Frederick Loren (Vincent Price), House on Haunted Hill, near the end of the movie (1958).)
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  • 43.
    Murder offers the promise of vast relief. It is never unsexual.
    (Norman Mailer (b. 1923), U.S. author. Stephen Rojack, in An American Dream, ch. 1, Dial (1965).)
    More quotations from: Norman Mailer, murder
  • 44.
    It is surely easier to confess a murder over a cup of coffee than in front of a jury.
    (Friedrich Dürrenmatt (1921-1990), Swiss dramatist, novelist, essayist. Trans. by Gerhard P. Knapp (1995). The Marriage of Mr. Mississippi, pt. I (1952).)
    More quotations from: Friedrich Dürrenmatt, murder
  • 45.
    Every murder turns on a bright hot light, and a lot of people ... have to walk out of the shadows.
    (Mark Hellinger (1903-1947), U.S. journalist, scriptwriter, producer. The Naked City, scripted by Albert Maltz and Marvin Wald (1948). Narrating his last production.)
  • 46.
    I say a murder is abstract. You pull the trigger and after that you do not understand anything that happens.
    (Jean-Paul Sartre (1905-1980), French novelist, dramatist, philosopher, political activist. Methuen (1963). Dirty Hands, act 5, sc.2, Gallimard (1948).)
    More quotations from: Jean-Paul Sartre, murder
  • 47.
    AIDS obliges people to think of sex as having, possibly, the direst consequences: suicide. Or murder.
    (Susan Sontag (b. 1933), U.S. essayist. AIDS and Its Metaphors, ch. 7 (1989).)
  • 48.
    Of what violences, murders, depredations, have not the epic poets, from all antiquity, been the occasion, by propagating false honor, false glory, and false religion?
    (Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). Charlotte Grandison, in Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 6, letter 45, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).)
    More quotations from: Samuel Richardson, epic
  • 49.
    The same people who are murdered slowly in the mechanized slaughterhouses of work are also arguing, singing, drinking, dancing, making love, holding the streets, picking up weapons and inventing a new poetry.
    (Raoul Vaneigem (b. 1934), Belgian situationist philosopher. The Revolution of Everyday Life, ch. 5 (1967, trans. 1983).)
  • 50.
    Mortals are easily tempted to pinch the life out of their neighbour's buzzing glory, and think that such killing is no murder.
    (George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. Middlemarch, ch. 21 (1871-1872).)
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