Quotations About / On: LOST

  • 11.
    A country losing touch with its own history is like an old man losing his glasses, a distressing sight, at once vulnerable, unsure, and easily disoriented.
    (George Walden (b. 1939), British Conservative politician. Times (London, December 20, 1986).)
    More quotations from: George Walden, history
  • 12.
    Besides, you start drinking whiskey gambling, it gives you an excuse for losing. That's something you don't need, an excuse for losing.
    (Sydney Carroll, U.S. screenwriter, and Robert Rossen. Bert Gordon (George C. Scott), The Hustler, to Fast Eddie Felson (Paul Newman) (1961).)
    More quotations from: Sydney Carroll
  • 13.
    In history as in human life, regret does not bring back a lost moment and a thousand years will not recover something lost in a single hour.
    (Stefan Zweig (18811942), Austrian writer. Sternstunden der Menschheit (Stellar Moments in Human History), p. 72, trans. by Marion Sonnenfeld, S. Fischer Verlag (1953).)
    More quotations from: Stefan Zweig, lost, history, life
  • 14.
    ... it is not only our fate but our business to lose innocence, and once we have lost that it is futile to attempt a picnic in Eden.
    (Elizabeth Bowen (1899-1973), British novelist, story writer, essayist, and memoirist; born in Ireland. As quoted in Elizabeth Bowen, ch. 2, by Victoria Glendinning (1979). Written in 1946.)
  • 15.
    France has lost a battle. But France has not lost the war!
    (Charles De Gaulle (1890-1970), French general, president. Speech, broadcast June 18, 1940, from London. Speeches of General de Gaulle (1941). De Gaulle's famous words were not part of the official typescript for this speech, and not issued in written form until the following month.)
    More quotations from: Charles De Gaulle, lost, war
  • 16.
    The conventional army loses if it does not win. The guerrilla wins if he does not lose.
    (Henry Kissinger (b. 1923), U.S. Republican politician, secretary of state. quoted in Foreign Affairs (New York, Jan. 1969). On the war in Vietnam.)
    More quotations from: Henry Kissinger
  • 17.
    War: first, one hopes to win; then one expects the enemy to lose; then, one is satisfied that he too is suffering; in the end, one is surprised that everyone has lost.
    (Karl Kraus (1874-1936), Austrian satirist. repr. In Thomas Szasz, Anti-Freud: Karl Kraus's Criticism of Psychoanalysis and Psychiatry, ch. 8 (1976). Die Fackel (Vienna, Oct. 9, 1917), no. 462/71.)
    More quotations from: Karl Kraus, lost, war
  • 18.
    Man's true nature being lost, everything becomes his nature; as, his true good being lost, everything becomes his good.
    (Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. repr. Encyclopedia Britannica, Chicago (1952). Pensées, no. 426 (1670), trans. J.M. Dent & Sons, London (1931).)
    More quotations from: Blaise Pascal, lost, nature
  • 19.
    If the head is lost, all that perishes is the individual; if the balls are lost, all of human nature perishes.
    (François Rabelais (1494-1553), French author, evangelist. Panurge to Pantagruel, in Third Book, ch. 8, p. 375, Pleiade edition (1995).)
    More quotations from: François Rabelais, lost, nature
  • 20.
    It is a strange desire, to seek power, and to lose liberty; or to seek power over others, and to lose power over a man's self.
    (Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. "Of Great Place," Essays (1597-1625).)
    More quotations from: Francis Bacon, power
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