Quotations About / On: LOSS

  • 41.
    Intimacies between women go backwards, beginning with revelations and ending up in small talk without loss of esteem.
    (Elizabeth Bowen (1899-1973), Anglo-Irish novelist. The Death of the Heart, pt. 2, ch. 1 (1938).)
    More quotations from: Elizabeth Bowen, loss, women
  • 42.
    No amount of skill on the part of the actress can make up for the loss of youth.
    (Ellen Terry (1847-1928), British actor. Ellen Terry's Memoirs, 2nd. ed., ch. 13 (1932). Written in 1906 or 1907.)
    More quotations from: Ellen Terry, loss
  • 43.
    Perhaps it is a universal truth that the loss of liberty at home is to be charged to provisions against danger, real or pretended, from abroad.
    (James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Madison to Jefferson, May 13, 1798. W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 17, p. 130, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991).)
    More quotations from: James Madison, loss, home, truth
  • 44.
    The shimmering night does not stay for mortals, not misfortunes, nor wealth, but in a moment it is gone, and to the turn of another comes joy and loss.
    (Sophocles (497-406/5 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Women of Trachis, l. 132.)
  • 45.
    Disappointment, when it involves neither shame nor loss, is as good as success; for it supplies as many images to the mind, and as many topics to the tongue.
    (Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Letter, June 26, 1775, to Hester Thrale. The Letters of Samuel Johnson, vol. 2, no. 411, ed. R. W. Chapman (1952).)
    More quotations from: Samuel Johnson, loss, success
  • 46.
    Take care to sell your horse before he dies. The art of life is passing losses on.
    (Robert Frost (1874-1963), U.S. poet. "The Ingenuities of Debt," The Poetry of Robert Frost (1979).)
    More quotations from: Robert Frost, horse, life
  • 47.
    No performance is worth loss of geniality. 'Tis a cruel price we pay for certain fancy goods called fine arts and philosophy.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Culture," The Conduct of Life (1860).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, loss
  • 48.
    When we suffer anguish we return to early childhood because that is the period in which we first learnt to suffer the experience of total loss. It was more than that. It was the period in which we suffered more total losses than in all the rest of our life put together.
    (John Berger (b. 1926), British author, critic. (repr. 1976). A Fortunate Man, p. 122 (1967).)
  • 49.
    Nothing that grieves us can be called little: by the eternal laws of proportion a child's loss of a doll and a king's loss of a crown are events of the same size.
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. "Which Was the Dream?" (Written 1897), published in Which Was the Dream and Other Symbolic Writings, ed. John S. Tuckey (1967). Unfinished story; real name is Samuel Langhorne Clemens.)
  • 50.
    It is hard for many people to know who they are when they are sold a false bill of materialistic and unrealistic dreams; joy and contentment are often found in small things and work well done; thinking and wearing your heart on your sleeve means facing loss mistakes disappointment and unresolved issues; it should also mean the desire to resolve past issues move on and love life; first we have to make a form of peace with ourselves, before we can effectively have healthy peaceful relationships, with family friends and strangers, because all strangers are potential friends. The reality is life contains measures of opportunities joys difficulties problems and conflict, life is hard, good friends help us carry the load.
    (Terence George Craddock March 2016 on the 11.3.2016)
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