Quotations About / On: LOSS

  • 41.
    Our concern for the loss of our friends is not always from a sense of their worth, but rather of our own need of them—and that we have lost some who had a good opinion of us.
    (François, Duc De La Rochefoucauld (1613-1680), French writer, moralist. repr. F.A. Stokes Co., New York (c. 1930). Moral Maxims and Reflections, no. 235 (1665-1678), trans. London (1706).)
  • 42.
    If I use the media, even with tricks, to publicise a black youth being shot in the back in Teaneck, New Jersey ... then I should be praised for it, and it's more of a comment on them than me that it would take tricks to make them cover the loss of life.
    (Al, Rev. Sharpton (b. 1954), U.S. civil rights campaigner. Independent on Sunday (London, April 21, 1991).)
    More quotations from: Rev Sharpton, Al, loss, black, life
  • 43.
    I never saw love as luck, as that gift from the gods which put everything else in place, and allowed you to succeed. No, I saw love as reward. One could find it only after one's virtue, or one's courage, or self-sacrifice, or generosity, or loss, has succeeded in stirring the power of creation.
    (Norman Mailer (b. 1923), U.S. author. Harry Hubbard, in Harlot's Ghost, Omega 6, Random House (1991).)
  • 44.
    The history of modern art is also the history of the progressive loss of art's audience. Art has increasingly become the concern of the artist and the bafflement of the public.
    (Henry Geldzahler (1935-1994), Belgian-born U.S. curator, art critic. repr. In The New Art: A Critical Anthology, ed. Gregory Battcock (1966, rev. 1973). "The Art Audience and the Critic," Hudson Review (New York, Spring 1965).)
    More quotations from: Henry Geldzahler, history, loss
  • 45.
    Never does one feel oneself so utterly helpless as in trying to speak comfort for great bereavement. I will not try it. Time is the only comforter for the loss of a mother.
    (Jane Welsh Carlyle (1801-1866), Scottish poet. letter, Dec. 27, 1853, to her husband, Thomas Carlyle. Letters and Memorials (1883).)
  • 46.
    The boys dressed themselves, hid their accoutrements, and went off grieving that there were no outlaws any more, and wondering what modern civilization could claim to have done to compensate for their loss. They said they would rather be outlaws a year in Sherwood Forest than President of the United States forever.
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, ch. 8 (1876).)
  • 47.
    The cultivation of one set of faculties tends to the disuse of others. The loss of one faculty sharpens others; the blind are sensitive in touch. Has not the extreme cultivation of the commercial faculty permitted others as essential to national life, to be blighted by disease?
    (J. Ellen Foster (1840-1910), U.S. attorney, temperance activist, and suffragist. What America Owes to Women, ch. 33 (1893). Reflecting on America's national prosperity.)
    More quotations from: J. Ellen Foster, loss, life
  • 48.
    I have always observed, when there is as much sour as sweet in a compliment, that an Englishman is eternally at a loss within himself, whether to take it, or let it alone: a Frenchman never is.
    (Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy by Mr. Yorick (1768), ch. "Calais," ed. Gardner D. Stout, Jr., University of California Press (1967).)
    More quotations from: Laurence Sterne, loss, alone
  • 49.
    We now talk of our killed and wounded. There is however a very happy feeling. Those who escape regret of course the loss of comrades and friends, but their own escape and safety to some extent modifies their feelings.
    (Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822-1893), U.S. president. Diary and Letters of Rutherford Birchard Hayes: Nineteenth President of the United States, vol. II, p. 530, ed. Charles Richard Williams, The Ohio State Archaeological and Historical Society, 5 vols. (1922-1926), Hayes to Lucy Webb Hayes (October 25, 1864). After the battle of Cedar Creek.)
  • 50.
    I never saw a fatter man; he'd have given my mother a stone or two and not felt the loss. Round as the "o" in rotund.
    (Angela Carter (1940-1992), British postmodern novelist. repr. Black Venus, Chatto & Windus (1985). "The Kitchen Child," p. 97, Vogue (1979).)
    More quotations from: Angela Carter, loss, mother
[Hata Bildir]