Quotations About / On: LOSS

  • 31.
    When a man laughs at his troubles he loses a good many friends. They never forgive the loss of their prerogative.
    (H.L. (Henry Lewis) Mencken (1880-1956), U.S. journalist, critic. The Vintage Mencken, ch. 47, p. 231, ed. Alistair Cooke, Vintage (1956).)
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  • 32.
    Weep not for little Leonie, Abducted by a French Marquis! Though loss of honour was a wrench, Just think how it's improved her French.
    (Harry Graham (1874-1936), British author, rhymester. "Compensation," More Ruthless Rhymes for Heartless Hommes (1930).)
    More quotations from: Harry Graham, loss
  • 33.
    We now talk of our killed and wounded. There is however a very happy feeling. Those who escape regret of course the loss of comrades and friends, but their own escape and safety to some extent modifies their feelings.
    (Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822-1893), U.S. president. Diary and Letters of Rutherford Birchard Hayes: Nineteenth President of the United States, vol. II, p. 530, ed. Charles Richard Williams, The Ohio State Archaeological and Historical Society, 5 vols. (1922-1926), Hayes to Lucy Webb Hayes (October 25, 1864). After the battle of Cedar Creek.)
  • 34.
    I never saw a fatter man; he'd have given my mother a stone or two and not felt the loss. Round as the "o" in rotund.
    (Angela Carter (1940-1992), British postmodern novelist. repr. Black Venus, Chatto & Windus (1985). "The Kitchen Child," p. 97, Vogue (1979).)
    More quotations from: Angela Carter, loss, mother
  • 35.
    Every nation ... whose affairs betray a want of wisdom and stability may calculate on every loss which can be sustained from the more systematic policy of its wiser neighbors.
    (James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. The Federalist Papers, Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, John Jay, p. 381, ed. Clinton Rossiter, New York (1961). The Federalist, No. 62 (February 27, 1788).)
    More quotations from: James Madison, loss
  • 36.
    [I]f our reader should be neither informed nor amused, we shall be very sorry for his loss of time as well as our own.
    (Sarah Fielding (1710-1768), British novelist, and Jane Collier. The Cry: A New Dramatic Fable, Introduction (1754).)
    More quotations from: Sarah Fielding, sorry, loss, time
  • 37.
    We feel public misfortunes just so far as they affect our private circumstances, and nothing of this nature appeals more directly to us than the loss of money.
    (Titus Livius (Livy) (59 B.C.-A.D. 17), Roman historian. Histories, XXX, 44.)
  • 38.
    One of the great penalties those of us who live our lives in full view of the public must pay is the loss of that most cherished birthright of man's privacy.
    (Mary Pickford (1893-1979), U.S. actor. Sunshine and Shadow, ch. 22 (1955). On the publicity that surrounded her break from her second husband, actor Douglas Fairbanks (1883-1939). He had become quite publicly involved with another woman.)
    More quotations from: Mary Pickford, loss
  • 39.
    The loss of my sight was a great fillip. If I could go deaf and dumb I think I might pant on to be a hundred.
    (Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. First edition, 1958. Mr. Rooney, in "All That Fall," reprinted in Krapp's Last Tape, p. 75, Grove Press (1960).)
    More quotations from: Samuel Beckett, loss
  • 40.
    "Letting go" ...implies generosity, a talent a good mother needs in abundance. Separation is not loss, it is not cutting yourself off from someone you love. It is giving freedom to the other person to be herself before she becomes resentful, stunted, and suffocated by being tied too close. Separation is not the end of love. It creates love.
    (Nancy Friday (20th century), U.S. author. My Mother, My Self, ch. 3 (1977).)
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