Quotations About / On: LOSS

  • 21.
    Like cellulite creams or hair-loss tonics, capital punishment is one of those panaceas that isn't. Only it costs a whole lot more.
    (Anna Quindlen (b. 1952), U.S. journalist, columnist, author. The New York Times, sect. 1, p. 23 (November 19, 1994).)
    More quotations from: Anna Quindlen, loss, hair
  • 22.
    The mark of a true politician is that he is never at a loss for words because he is always half-expecting to be asked to make a speech.
    (Richard M. Nixon (b. 1913), U.S. Republican politician, president. "The Campaign of 1960," Six Crises (1962).)
    More quotations from: Richard M Nixon, loss
  • 23.
    I never saw love as luck, as that gift from the gods which put everything else in place, and allowed you to succeed. No, I saw love as reward. One could find it only after one's virtue, or one's courage, or self-sacrifice, or generosity, or loss, has succeeded in stirring the power of creation.
    (Norman Mailer (b. 1923), U.S. author. Harry Hubbard, in Harlot's Ghost, Omega 6, Random House (1991).)
  • 24.
    The history of modern art is also the history of the progressive loss of art's audience. Art has increasingly become the concern of the artist and the bafflement of the public.
    (Henry Geldzahler (1935-1994), Belgian-born U.S. curator, art critic. repr. In The New Art: A Critical Anthology, ed. Gregory Battcock (1966, rev. 1973). "The Art Audience and the Critic," Hudson Review (New York, Spring 1965).)
    More quotations from: Henry Geldzahler, history, loss
  • 25.
    Never does one feel oneself so utterly helpless as in trying to speak comfort for great bereavement. I will not try it. Time is the only comforter for the loss of a mother.
    (Jane Welsh Carlyle (1801-1866), Scottish poet. letter, Dec. 27, 1853, to her husband, Thomas Carlyle. Letters and Memorials (1883).)
  • 26.
    The boys dressed themselves, hid their accoutrements, and went off grieving that there were no outlaws any more, and wondering what modern civilization could claim to have done to compensate for their loss. They said they would rather be outlaws a year in Sherwood Forest than President of the United States forever.
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, ch. 8 (1876).)
  • 27.
    The cultivation of one set of faculties tends to the disuse of others. The loss of one faculty sharpens others; the blind are sensitive in touch. Has not the extreme cultivation of the commercial faculty permitted others as essential to national life, to be blighted by disease?
    (J. Ellen Foster (1840-1910), U.S. attorney, temperance activist, and suffragist. What America Owes to Women, ch. 33 (1893). Reflecting on America's national prosperity.)
    More quotations from: J. Ellen Foster, loss, life
  • 28.
    I have always observed, when there is as much sour as sweet in a compliment, that an Englishman is eternally at a loss within himself, whether to take it, or let it alone: a Frenchman never is.
    (Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy by Mr. Yorick (1768), ch. "Calais," ed. Gardner D. Stout, Jr., University of California Press (1967).)
    More quotations from: Laurence Sterne, loss, alone
  • 29.
    Women who have had no lovers, or having had one, two or three, have not found a husband, have perhaps rather had a miss than a loss, as men go.
    (Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). Harriet Byron, in Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 2, letter 2, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).)
  • 30.
    There will be but few people who, when at a loss for topics of conversation, will not reveal the more secret affairs of their friends.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, pp. 245-246, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980); Human, All-Too- Human, p. 178, trans. by Marion Faber and Stephen Lehmann, Lincoln, Nebraska, University of Nebraska Press (1984). Human, All-Too-Human, "Man in Society," aphorism 327, "A Friend's Secret," (1878).)
    More quotations from: Friedrich Nietzsche, loss, people
[Hata Bildir]