Treasure Island

Quotations About / On: LOSS

  • 11.
    Intimacies between women go backwards, beginning with revelations and ending up in small talk without loss of esteem.
    (Elizabeth Bowen (1899-1973), Anglo-Irish novelist. The Death of the Heart, pt. 2, ch. 1 (1938).)
    More quotations from: Elizabeth Bowen, loss, women
  • 12.
    Children, dear and loving children, can alone console a woman for the loss of her beauty.
    (Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Mme. Gaston in a letter to Mme. De l'Estorade, in Letters of Two Brides (Mémoires de Deux Jeunes Mariées), in La Presse (1841-1842), Souverain (1842), included in the Scènes de la Vie Privée in the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971).)
  • 13.
    Men sooner forget the death of their father than the loss of their patrimony.
    (Niccolò Machiavelli (1469-1527), Italian political philosopher, statesman. The Prince, ch. 17 (1514).)
  • 14.
    No amount of skill on the part of the actress can make up for the loss of youth.
    (Ellen Terry (1847-1928), British actor. Ellen Terry's Memoirs, 2nd. ed., ch. 13 (1932). Written in 1906 or 1907.)
    More quotations from: Ellen Terry, loss
  • 15.
    All loss, all pain, is particular; the universe remains to the heart unhurt.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Spiritual Laws," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).)
  • 16.
    When we suffer anguish we return to early childhood because that is the period in which we first learnt to suffer the experience of total loss. It was more than that. It was the period in which we suffered more total losses than in all the rest of our life put together.
    (John Berger (b. 1926), British author, critic. (repr. 1976). A Fortunate Man, p. 122 (1967).)
  • 17.
    Bad company is as instructive as licentiousness. One makes up for the loss of one's innocence with the loss of one's prejudices.
    (Denis Diderot (1713-1784), French philosopher, encyclopedist, dramatist, novelist, art critic. First published in French retranslation from Goethe's German translation (1821). Rameau's Nephew (Le Neveu de Rameau), p. 90, Paris, Garnier Flammarion (1983). Dialogue between Me (alias Diderot) and Him (nephew of composer). Him is making this statement.)
    More quotations from: Denis Diderot, loss, innocence
  • 18.
    Nothing that grieves us can be called little: by the eternal laws of proportion a child's loss of a doll and a king's loss of a crown are events of the same size.
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. "Which Was the Dream?" (Written 1897), published in Which Was the Dream and Other Symbolic Writings, ed. John S. Tuckey (1967). Unfinished story; real name is Samuel Langhorne Clemens.)
  • 19.
    Our concern for the loss of our friends is not always from a sense of their worth, but rather of our own need of them—and that we have lost some who had a good opinion of us.
    (François, Duc De La Rochefoucauld (1613-1680), French writer, moralist. repr. F.A. Stokes Co., New York (c. 1930). Moral Maxims and Reflections, no. 235 (1665-1678), trans. London (1706).)
  • 20.
    If I use the media, even with tricks, to publicise a black youth being shot in the back in Teaneck, New Jersey ... then I should be praised for it, and it's more of a comment on them than me that it would take tricks to make them cover the loss of life.
    (Al, Rev. Sharpton (b. 1954), U.S. civil rights campaigner. Independent on Sunday (London, April 21, 1991).)
    More quotations from: Rev Sharpton, Al, loss, black, life
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