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Quotations About / On: LONELY

  • 21.
    Human Dignity has gleamed only now and then and here and there, in lonely splendor, throughout the ages, a hope of the better men, never an achievement of the majority.
    (James Thurber (1894-1961), U.S. humorist, illustrator. "Thinking Ourselves Into Trouble," pt. 3, Collecting Himself (1989, first published 1939).)
    More quotations from: James Thurber, lonely, hope
  • 22.
    You'll stay here with me my child, won't you? It's been so lonely without you. But you've come to me at last, haven't you? Now you'll sing for me and I'll play and we'll be together forever.
    (Eric Taylor, and Leroux. Arthur Lubin. Erique Claudin (Claude Rains), Phantom of the Opera, to Christine, whom he's taken to his underground home (1943). Adaptation by John Jacoby.)
  • 23.
    The torment of human frustration, whatever its immediate cause, is the knowledge that the self is in prison, its vital force and "mangled mind" leaking away in lonely, wasteful self-conflict.
    (Elizabeth Drew (1887-1965), Anglo-American author, critic. Poetry: A Modern Guide to Its Understanding and Enjoyment, pt. 2, ch. 13 (1959).)
    More quotations from: Elizabeth Drew, lonely
  • 24.
    The modern city hardly knows pure darkness or pure silence anymore, nor does it know the effect of a single small light or that of a lonely distant shout.
    (Johan Huizinga (1872-1945), Dutch historian. The Autumn of the Middle Ages, ch. 1 (1921, trans. 1995).)
  • 25.
    There is no lonelier man in death, except the suicide, than that man who has lived many years with a good wife and then outlived her. If two people love each other there can be no happy end to it.
    (Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961), U.S. author. Death in the Afternoon, ch. 11 (1932).)
  • 26.
    I have at last, after several months' experience, made up my mind that [New York] is a splendid desert—a domed and steepled solitude, where the stranger is lonely in the midst of a million of his race.
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. Daily Alta California (June 5, 1867). Mark Twain's Travels with Mr. Brown, ch. 25, eds. Franklin Walker and G. Ezra Dane, Knopf (1940).)
  • 27.
    Writing, at its best, is a lonely life. Organizations for writers palliate the writer's loneliness, but I doubt if they improve his writing. He grows in public stature as he sheds his loneliness and often his work deteriorates. For he does his work alone and if he is a good enough writer he must face eternity, or the lack of it, each day.
    (Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961), U.S. author. address recorded for the Nobel Prize Committee, Dec. 10, 1954, accepting the Nobel Prize for literature. Published in Carlos Baker, Hemingway: the Writer as Artist, ch. 13, third edition (1963).)
  • 28.
    The haughty and imperious part of a man develops rapidly on one of these lonely sugar plantations, where the owner rarely meets with anyone except his slaves and minions.
    (Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822-1893), U.S. president. Diary and Letters of Rutherford Birchard Hayes: Nineteenth President of the United States, vol. I, p. 254, ed. Charles Richard Williams, The Ohio State Archaeological and Historical Society, 5 vols. (1922-1926), Diary (January 30, 1849). Written while visiting a college classmate in Texas.)
  • 29.
    The twentieth-century artist who uses symbols is alienated because the system of symbols is a private one. After you have dealt with the symbols you are still private, you are still lonely, because you are not sure anyone will understand it except yourself. The ransom of privacy is that you are alone.
    (Louise Bourgeois (b. 1911), U.S. sculptor. As quoted in Lives and Works, by Lynn F. Miller and Sally S. Swenson (1981).)
    More quotations from: Louise Bourgeois, lonely, alone
  • 30.
    A lonely man is a lonesome thing, a stone, a bone, a stick, a receptacle for Gilbey's gin, a stooped figure sitting at the edge of a hotel bed, heaving copious sighs like the autumn wind.
    (John Cheever (1912-1982), U.S. author. "The Sixties," 1966 entry, John Cheever: The Journals, ed. Robert Gottlieb (1991).)
    More quotations from: John Cheever, autumn, lonely, wind
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