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Quotations About / On: LIFE

  • 21.
    There is no private life which has not been determined by a wider public life.
    (George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist, editor. Felix Holt, The Radical, ch. 3 (1866).)
  • 22.
    He who does not accept and respect those who want to reject life does not truly accept and respect life itself.
    (Thomas Szasz (b. 1920), U.S. psychiatrist. "Suicide," The Second Sin (1973).)
    More quotations from: Thomas Szasz, respect, life
  • 23.
    Nothing is a matter of life and death except life and death.
    (Angela Carter (1940-1992), British postmodern novelist. repr. Penguin. Wise Children, ch. 4, Chatto & Windus (1991).)
    More quotations from: Angela Carter, death, life
  • 24.
    Nothing in life possesses value except the degree of power—assuming that life itself is the will to power.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 12, p. 215, selection 5[71], eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Unpublished note dating to Summer 1886Fall 1887, series on "European Nihilism," section 10 (June 10, 1887).)
    More quotations from: Friedrich Nietzsche, power, life
  • 25.
    The destructive character lives from the feeling, not that life is worth living, but that suicide is not worth the trouble.
    (Walter Benjamin (1892-1940), German critic, philosopher. repr. In One-Way Street and Other Writings (1978). "The Destructive Character," Frankfurter Zeitung (Nov. 20, 1931).)
    More quotations from: Walter Benjamin, suicide, life
  • 26.
    In comedy, reconcilement with life comes at the point when to the tragic sense only an inalienable difference or dissension with life appears.
    (Constance Rourke (1885-1941), U.S. author. American Humor, ch. 8 (1931).)
    More quotations from: Constance Rourke, life
  • 27.
    Capital is dead labor, which, vampire-like, lives only by sucking living labor, and lives the more, the more labor it sucks.
    (Karl Marx (1818-1883), German political theorist and social philosopher. Capital, vol. 1, ch. 10 (1867).)
    More quotations from: Karl Marx
  • 28.
    But eternal liveliness is what counts: what does "eternal life" matter, or life at all?
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, p. 533, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Mixed Opinions and Maxims, aphorism 408 (1879).)
    More quotations from: Friedrich Nietzsche, life
  • 29.
    All good things are strong inducements to life, even that good book written to attack life.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, p. 386, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Mixed Opinions and Maxims, aphorism 16, "Good Things Seduce Us to Life," (1879).)
    More quotations from: Friedrich Nietzsche, life
  • 30.
    Political life at Washington is like political life in a suburban vestry.
    (Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. "The American Invasion," Court and Society Review (March 1887).)
    More quotations from: Oscar Wilde, life
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