Quotations About / On: LAUGHTER

  • 11.
    Laughter scares off lust.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Ninth Selection, New York (1992).)
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  • 12.
    The laughter of the aphorism is sometimes triumphant, but seldom carefree.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Sixth Selection, New York (1989).)
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  • 13.
    A man who whinnies with noisy laughter, surpasses all the animals in vulgarity.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, p. 330, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Human, All-Too-Human, "Man Alone With Himself," aphorism 553, "Below the Animals," (1878).)
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  • 14.
    Laughter and tears may not persuade, but they cannot be refuted.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Thirteenth Selection, New York (1994).)
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  • 15.
    In the vain laughter of folly wisdom hears half its applause.
    (George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans] (1819-1880), British novelist. Romola, bk. 1, ch. 12 (1863). Pseudonym of Mary Ann (or Marian) Evans.)
  • 16.
    Laughter means: taking a mischievous delight in someone else's uneasiness, but with a good conscience.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 3, p. 506, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). The Gay Science, first edition, "Third Book," aphorism 200, "Laughter," (1882). The German expression translated as "taking a mischievous delight in someone else's uneasiness" is schadenfroh sein.)
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  • 17.
    Laughter is ever young, whereas tragedy, except the very highest of all, quickly becomes haggard.
    (Margaret Sackville (1881-1963), British poet. The Works of Susan Ferrier, vol. 1, introduction (1929).)
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  • 18.
    There comes a time when suddenly you realize that laughter is something you remember and that you were the one laughing.
    (Marlene Dietrich (1904-1992), German-born U.S. actor. "Laughter," Marlene Dietrich's ABC (1962).)
  • 19.
    Not with wrath do we kill, but with laughter. Come, let us kill the spirit of gravity!
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 4, p. 49, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Zarathustra, in Thus Spoke Zarathustra, First Part, "On Reading and Writing," (1883).)
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  • 20.
    He was born with a gift of laughter and a sense that the world was mad. And that was all his patrimony.
    (Rafael Sabatini (1875-1950), Italian-born British author. Scaramouche, bk. 1, ch. 1 (1921). Opening words, describing the book's hero, André-Louis Moreau.)
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