Quotations About / On: KISS

  • 21.
    A kiss may ruin a human life.
    (Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Mrs. Arbuthnot, in A Woman of No Importance, act 4.)
    More quotations from: Oscar Wilde, kiss, life
  • 22.
    A compliment is something like a kiss through a veil.
    (Victor Hugo (1802-1885), French poet, dramatist, novelist. Les Misérables, pt. 4, bk. 8, ch. 1 (1862).)
    More quotations from: Victor Hugo, kiss
  • 23.
    Ignorance is not bliss. It is the kiss of death.
    (Suzy Kassem)
    More quotations from: Suzy Kassem
  • 24.
    A seabubble was struck by a seacrane ray and turned then into bubblespray. A seabubble by a fish was kissed and transmuted into bubblemist.
    (Saiom Shriver)
    More quotations from: Saiom Shriver
  • 25.
    Illegal lust, to hiss like a snake and to kiss the young girl; leading you to defile her.
    (Rape.)
    More quotations from: Edward Kofi Louis
  • 26.
    The sound of a kiss is not so loud as that of a cannon, but its echo lasts a great deal longer.
    (Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (1809-1894), U.S. writer, physician. The Professor at the Breakfast-Table, ch. 11 (1859).)
    More quotations from: Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr., kiss
  • 27.
    I really think that American gentlemen are the best after all, because kissing your hand may make you feel very very good but a diamond and a sapphire bracelet lasts forever.
    (Anita Loos (1893-1981), U.S. novelist, screenwriter. Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, "Paris is Divine," (1925). Lorelei Lee's journal entry, April 27.)
    More quotations from: Anita Loos, forever
  • 28.
    Marrying any man is risky. Marrying a famous man is kissing catastrophe.
    (John Colton (1886-1946). Stuart Walker. Miss Ettie Coombs (Spring Byington), Werewolf of London, lamenting her niece's marriage to the famous Dr. Glendon (1935). Original story by Robert Harris; Colton was born in Japan, of British parents, and then moved to America—you figure out his nationality.)
    More quotations from: John Colton
  • 29.
    Johann Strauss—Forty couples dancing ... one by one they slip from the hall ... sounds of kisses ... the lights go out
    (H.L. (Henry Lewis) Mencken (1880-1956), U.S. journalist, critic. Originally published in the Smart Set (May 1912). The Vintage Mencken, ch. 26, p. 141, ed. Alistair Cooke, Vintage (1956).)
    More quotations from: H.L. (Henry Lewis) Mencken
  • 30.
    Once one has kissed a cadaver's forehead, there always remains something of it on the lips, an infinite bitterness, an aftertaste of nothingness that nothing can erase.
    (Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880), French novelist. Trans. by William G. Allen. Pensées de Gustave Flaubert, p. 64, Conard (1915).)
    More quotations from: Gustave Flaubert
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