Treasure Island

Quotations About / On: JOY

  • 31.
    The land of joy, the lovely glades of the fortunate woods and the home of the blest.
    (Virgil [Publius Vergilius Maro] (70-19 B.C.), Roman poet. Aeneid, bk. 6, l. 638 (19 B.C.), trans. by David West (1991). Referring to the Elysian Fields, a stop on Aeneas's journey to the Underworld.)
  • 32.
    As with all children, the feeling that I was useful was perhaps the greatest joy I experienced.
    (Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962), First Lady of the United States, author, speaker, and diplomat. This Is My Story, ch. 1 (1937).)
    More quotations from: Eleanor Roosevelt, joy, children
  • 33.
    Tortures are to them what joys are to us.
    (Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Pauline, in Polyeucte, act 3, sc. 3 (1641). Pauline is a Roman, speaking of early Christians.)
    More quotations from: Pierre Corneille
  • 34.
    I do not remember joy or sorrow in childhood, but listening for clues.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Tenth Selection, New York (1992).)
  • 35.
    Joy goes as deep as sorrow, but leaves less of itself behind.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, Twelfth Selection, New York (1993).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley, sorrow, joy
  • 36.
    It's almost worth having been in the army for the joy your freedom gives you.
    (John Dos Passos (1896-1970), U.S. novelist, poet, playwright, painter. Originally published in 1922. John Andrews in Three Soldiers, Houghton Mifflin Company (1964).)
    More quotations from: John Dos Passos, joy, freedom
  • 37.
    The mother of excess is not joy but joylessness.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, p. 409, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Mixed Opinions and Maxims, aphorism 77, "Excess," (1879).)
    More quotations from: Friedrich Nietzsche, joy, mother
  • 38.
    Excess of joy is harder to bear than any amount of sorrow.
    (Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Mme. de l'Estorade in a letter to Mme. De Macumer, in Letters of Two Brides (Mémoires de Deux Jeunes Mariées), in La Presse (1841-1842), Souverain (1842), included in the Scènes de la Vie Privée in the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971).)
    More quotations from: Honoré De Balzac, sorrow, joy
  • 39.
    Joy wants the eternity of all things, wants deep, wants deep eternity.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 4, p. 403, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980); Thus Spoke Zarathustra, p. 324, trans. by Walter Kaufmann, New York, Viking Press (1966). Zarathustra, in Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Fourth and Last Part, "The Drunken Song," section 11 (issued privately in 1885, publication in 1892).)
    More quotations from: Friedrich Nietzsche, joy
  • 40.
    The joy of giving is indeed a pleasure, especially when you get rid of something you don't want.
    (Frank Butler (1890-1967), British screenwriter, and Frank Cavett (1907-1973), U.S. screenwriter. Father Fitzgibbon (Barry Fitzgerald), Going My Way, after receiving a dog and her newborn puppies from a parishioner (1944).)
    More quotations from: Frank Butler, joy
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