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Quotations About / On: ITALY

  • 1.
    Italy is a geographical expression.
    (Prince Metternich (1773-1859), Austrian statesman. letter, Nov. 19, 1849. Memoirs, vol. 7 (1883). The Prussian statesman Otto von Bismarck used the same term, in a marginal comment on a letter of Nov. 1876, to the Russian Chancellor Gorchakov: "Whoever speaks of Europe is wrong: it is a geographical expression.")
    More quotations from: Prince Metternich, italy
  • 2.
    Because one has little fear of shocking vanity in Italy, people adopt an intimate tone very quickly and discuss personal things.
    (Stendhal [Marie Henri Beyle] (1783-1842), French novelist. The Charterhouse of Parma, ch. VI, Dupont (1839) (trans. by Jeri King).)
  • 3.
    When intimacy followed love in Italy there were no longer any vain pretensions between two lovers.
    (Stendhal [Marie Henri Beyle] (1783-1842), French novelist. The Charterhouse of Parma, ch. VI, Dupont (1839) (trans. by Jeri King).)
  • 4.
    It's easy to understand why the most beautiful poems about England in the spring were written by poets living in Italy at the time.
    (Philip Dunne (1908-1992), U.S. screenwriter. Joseph L. Mankiewicz. Miles Fairley (George Sanders), The Ghost and Mrs. Muir, to Mrs. Muir during a spring shower (1947). From the novel by R.A. Dick.)
  • 5.
    It's easy to understand why the most beautiful poems about England in the spring were written by poets living in Italy at the time.
    (Philip Dunne (1908-1992), U.S. screenwriter, and Joseph L. Mankiewicz. Miles Fairley (George Sanders), The Ghost and Mrs. Muir (1947). To Mrs. Muir during a spring shower. From the novel by R.A. Dick.)
  • 6.
    Italy is a poor country full of rich people.
    (Richard Gardner (b. 1927), U.S. diplomat, former ambassador to Rome. quoted in Observer (London, Aug. 16, 1981).)
    More quotations from: Richard Gardner, italy, people
  • 7.
    Lump the whole thing! Say that the Creator made Italy from designs by Michael Angelo!
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. Dan, in The Innocents Abroad, ch. 27 (1869). Twain's surfeit of and exasperation with Michelangelo during his visit to Rome was eloquently expressed: "I used to worship the mighty genius of Michael Angelo.... But I do not want Michael Angelo for breakfast—for luncheon—for dinner—for tea—for supper—for between meals.... Here—here it is frightful. He designed St Peter's; he designed the Pope ... the eternal bore designed the Eternal City, and unless all men and books do lie, he painted everything in it!... I never felt so fervently thankful, so soothed, so tranquil, so filled with the blessed peace, as I did yesterday when I learned that Michael Angelo was dead.")
  • 8.
    There is something majestic in the bad taste of Italy.
    (E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster (1879-1970), British novelist, essayist. Where Angels Fear to Tread, ch. 6 (1905).)
    More quotations from: E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster, italy
  • 9.
    A man who has not been in Italy, is always conscious of an inferiority.
    (Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, April 11, 1776 (1791). Said over supper with James Boswell and the Corsican patriot Pasquale Paoli.)
    More quotations from: Samuel Johnson, italy
  • 10.
    Until recently the word fascist was considered shameful. Fortunately, that period has passed. In fact, there is now a reassessment of how much grandpa Benito did for Italy.
    (Alessandra Mussolini, Italian actor, politician, and medical student. As quoted in Newsweek magazine, p. 19 (February 17, 1992). The granddaughter of the Italian fascist dictator Benito Mussolini (1883-1945) was announcing that she intended to run for Parliament as a neofascist candidate.)
    More quotations from: Alessandra Mussolini, italy
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