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Quotations About / On: HAPPY

  • 11.
    Men die and they are not happy.
    (Albert Camus (1913-1960), French-Algerian novelist, dramatist, philosopher. Gallimard (1958). Caligula in Caligula, act 1, sc. 4, Pléiade (1962).)
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  • 12.
    Happy is the nation without a history.
    (Cesare Beccaria (1735-1794), Italian jurist, philosopher. On Crimes and Punishments, Introduction (1764). Thomas Carlyle attributes a similar utterance to Charles de Montesquieu, in History of Frederick the Great (1858-1865) bk. 16, ch. 1: "Happy the people whose annals are blank in history-books!")
    More quotations from: Cesare Beccaria, happy, history
  • 13.
    I'm down here all alone, but as happy as a king—at least, as happy as some kings—at any rate, I should think I'm about as happy as King Charles the First when he was in prison.
    (Lewis Carroll [Charles Lutwidge Dodgson] (1832-1898), British author, mathematician, clergyman. Letter, July 20, 1886, to his cousin, Menella Wilcox. The Letters of Lewis Carroll, vol. II, ed. Morton N. Cohen, Oxford University Press (1979).)
  • 14.
    Sir, that all who are happy, are equally happy, is not true. A peasant and a philosopher may be equally satisfied, but not equally happy. Happiness consists in the multiplicity of agreeable consciousness.
    (Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. quoted in James Boswell, Life of Dr. Johnson, entry, Feb. 1766 (1791). Johnson was arguing against the proposition by David Hume (in the essay The Sceptic) that "a little miss, dressed in a new gown for a dancing-school ball, receives as complete enjoyment as the greatest orator, who triumphs in the splendor of his eloquence.")
    More quotations from: Samuel Johnson, happy, happiness
  • 15.
    No sane man can be happy, for to him life is real, and he sees what a fearful thing it is.
    (Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. Satan, in The Mysterious Stranger, ch. 10 (1916).)
  • 16.
    Alimony—The ransom that the happy pay to the devil.
    (H.L. (Henry Lewis) Mencken (1880-1956), U.S. journalist, critic. The Vintage Mencken, ch. 47, p. 232, ed. Alistair Cooke, Vintage (1956).)
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  • 17.
    Happy the man who has been able to know the reasons for things.
    (Virgil [Publius Vergilius Maro] (70-19 B.C.), Roman poet. Georgics, bk. 2, l. 490 (19 B.C.), trans. by Kate Hughes (1995). Thought to refer to the poet and philosopher Lucretius.)
  • 18.
    We should laugh before being happy, for fear of dying without having laughed.
    (Jean De La Bruyère (1645-1696), French writer, moralist. Characters, "Of the Heart," aph. 63 (1688).)
  • 19.
    The people of England are never so happy as when you tell them they are ruined.
    (Arthur Murphy (1727-1805), Irish-born-British dramatist. Pamphlet, in The Upholsterer, act 2, sc. 1.)
    More quotations from: Arthur Murphy, happy, people
  • 20.
    This mother needs happy, reputable children, and that one needs unhappy ones: otherwise she cannot show her kindness as a mother.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, p. 267, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Human, All-Too-Human, "Woman and Child," aphorism 387, "Maternal Kindness," (1878).)
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