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Quotations About / On: HAPPINESS

  • 41.
    One mustn't ask apple trees for oranges, France for sun, women for love, life for happiness.
    (Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880), French novelist. Trans. by William G. Allen. Pensées de Gustave Flaubert, p. 3, Conard (1915).)
  • 42.
    Although Freud said happiness is composed of love and work, reality often forces us to choose love or work.
    (Letty Cottin Pogrebin (20th century), U.S. editor, writer. Family and Politics, ch. 6 (1983).)
  • 43.
    The idea that happiness could have a share in beauty would be too much of a good thing.
    (Walter Benjamin (1892-1940), German critic, philosopher. repr. In Illuminations, ed. Hannah Arendt (1968). The Image of Proust, sct. 1 (1929).)
    More quotations from: Walter Benjamin, happiness, beauty
  • 44.
    Lovers who love truly do not write down their happiness.
    (Anatole France (1844-1924), French author. "The Log, November 30, 1859," The Crime of Sylvestre Bonnard (1881).)
    More quotations from: Anatole France, happiness, love
  • 45.
    We have no more right to consume happiness without producing it than to consume wealth without producing it.
    (George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950), Anglo-Irish playwright, critic. Morell, in Candida, act 1.)
    More quotations from: George Bernard Shaw, happiness
  • 46.
    It's afterwards you realize that the feeling of happiness you had with a man didn't neccesarily prove that you loved him.
    (Marguerite Duras (b. 1914), French author, filmmaker. "The Chimneys of India Song," Practicalities (1987, trans. 1990).)
    More quotations from: Marguerite Duras, happiness
  • 47.
    As to happiness in this life it is hardly compatible with that diminished respect which ever attends the relinquishing of labour.
    (Anthony Trollope (1815-1882), British novelist. Rachel Ray, vol. 2, ch. xxx, London, Chapman and Hall (1863).)
  • 48.
    Happiness serves hardly any other purpose than to make unhappiness possible.
    (Marcel Proust (1871-1922), French novelist. "Time Regained," vol. 12, ch. 3, Remembrance of Things Past (1927), trans. by Stephen Hudson (1931).)
    More quotations from: Marcel Proust, happiness
  • 49.
    There is an excess both in happiness and misery above our power of sensation.
    (François, Duc De La Rochefoucauld (1613-1680), French writer, moralist. repr. F.A. Stokes Co., New York (c. 1930). Moral Maxims and Reflections, no. 466 (1665-1678), trans. London (1706).)
  • 50.
    Of all the cankers of human happiness, none corrodes it with so silent, yet so baneful a tooth, as indolence.
    (Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), U.S. president. Letter, March 28, 1787, to his daughter, Martha Jefferson. The Family Letters of Thomas Jefferson, p. 34, eds. E.M. Betts and J.A. Bear, Jr. (1966).)
    More quotations from: Thomas Jefferson, happiness
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