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Quotations About / On: FRIEND

  • 41.
    A man's friendships are, like his will, invalidated by marriage—but they are also no less invalidated by the marriage of his friends.
    (Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. The Way of All Flesh, ch. 75 (1903).)
    More quotations from: Samuel Butler, marriage
  • 42.
    If there could be such a thing as the Mammon of Righteousness Christina would have assuredly made friends with it.
    (Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1903. Ernest Pontifex, or The Way of All Flesh, ch. 12, p. 48, Houghton Mifflin (1964).)
    More quotations from: Samuel Butler
  • 43.
    The dead being the majority it is a natural thing that we should have more friends among these than among the living.
    (Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. First published in 1912. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 221, E.P. Dutton & Company (1951).)
    More quotations from: Samuel Butler
  • 44.
    We have not so good a right to hate any as our Friend.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Wednesday," A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, hate, friend
  • 45.
    Money couldn't buy friends, but you got a better class of enemy.
    (Spike Milligan (b. 1918), British comedian, humorous writer. Mrs. Doonan, in Puckoon, ch. 6 (1963).)
    More quotations from: Spike Milligan, money
  • 46.
    Health, south wind, books, old trees, a boat, a friend.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Emerson in His Journals, March 1847, ed. Joel Porte (1982).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, friend, wind
  • 47.
    In a multitude of acquaintances is less security, than in one faithful friend.
    (Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Mardi (1849), ch. 61, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 3, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1970).)
    More quotations from: Herman Melville, friend
  • 48.
    Where minds differ and opinions swerve there is scant a friend in that company.
    (Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 11, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923).)
    More quotations from: Elizabeth I, friend
  • 49.
    Do not trouble yourself much to get new things, whether clothes or friends.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 361, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau
  • 50.
    A benevolent man should allow a few faults in himself, to keep his friends in countenance.
    (Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. Autobiography, ch. 6 (written 1771-1790, publ. 1868).)
    More quotations from: Benjamin Franklin
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