Quotations About / On: FRIEND

  • 41.
    You think you can marry for your own pleasure, friend?
    (Molière [Jean Baptiste Poquelin] (1622-1673), French comic playwright. Mascarille, in The Amorous Quarrel (Le Dépit Amoureux), act 5, sc. 8 (1656).)
  • 42.
    Ladies and gentleman are permitted to have friends in the kennel, but not in the kitchen.
    (George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950), Anglo-Irish playwright, critic. "Maxims for Revolutionists: Servants," Man and Superman (1903).)
    More quotations from: George Bernard Shaw
  • 43.
    We should not talk about our friends: otherwise we will talk away the feeling of friendship.
    (Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, p. 489, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Mixed Opinions and Maxims, aphorism 252, "Silentium," (1879). The Latin word silentium in the title means "silence.")
    More quotations from: Friedrich Nietzsche
  • 44.
    A good book is the best of friends, the same today and for ever.
    (Martin Tupper (1810-1889), British author, poet, inventor. Proverbial Philosophy, "Of Reading," First Series (1838).)
    More quotations from: Martin Tupper, today
  • 45.
    Sometimes we can't avoid giving pain, even to friends.
    (Kenneth Langtry. Herbert L. Strock. Margaret (Phyllis Coates), Teenage Frankenstein, apologizing to the monster for hurting him with an injection (1957).)
    More quotations from: Kenneth Langtry, pain, sometimes
  • 46.
    Only my friends call me wop.
    (Daniel Taradash (b. 1913), U.S. screenwriter. Maggio (Frank Sinatra), From Here To Eternity, to Fatso (Ernest Borgnine) (1953).)
    More quotations from: Daniel Taradash
  • 47.
    The falling out of faithful friends, renewing is of love.
    (Richard Edwards (c.1523-1566), British poet. "Amantium Irae," The Paradise of Dainty Devices (1576). This last line of each of the poem's stanzas is an echo of an older line, from which the poem's Latin title is taken: see Terence.)
    More quotations from: Richard Edwards, love
  • 48.
    Lazarus was coolly received by his friends, who considered his case closed.
    (Mason Cooley (b. 1927), U.S. aphorist. City Aphorisms, New York (1984).)
    More quotations from: Mason Cooley
  • 49.
    For somehow this disease inheres in tyranny, never to trust one's friends.
    (Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Prometheus Bound, l. 224.)
    More quotations from: Aeschylus, trust
  • 50.
    You shall judge of a man by his foes as well as by his friends.
    (Joseph Conrad (1857-1924), Polish-born British novelist. Marlow, in Lord Jim, ch. 34 (1900).)
    More quotations from: Joseph Conrad
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