Quotations About / On: FIRE

  • 31.
    Killers, huh? I'd trade the pair of you for a good Camp Fire Girl.
    (Daniel Taradash (b. 1913), U.S. screenwriter. Sergeant Warden (Burt Lancaster), From Here To Eternity, after preventing a fight between Maggio (Frank Sinatra) and Fatso (Ernest Borgnine) (1953).)
    More quotations from: Daniel Taradash, girl, fire
  • 32.
    The child says nothing but what is heard by the fire.
    (Unknown (20th century).)
    More quotations from: Unknown, fire, child
  • 33.
    Envy like fire always makes for the highest points.
    (Titus Livius (Livy) (59 B.C.-A.D. 17), Roman historian. Histories, VIII, 31.)
    More quotations from: Titus Livius (Livy), fire
  • 34.
    At certain times, men regard poetry merely as a bright flame, but to women it was, and always will be, a warm fire.
    (Franz Grillparzer (1791-1872), Austrian author. "Album Leaf", Poems (1830).)
  • 35.
    Deliberate violence is more to be quenched than a fire.
    (Heraclitus (c. 535-475 B.C.), Greek philosopher. Diels-Kranz, Fragmente der Vorsokratiker, 22B43. Heraclitus, one of the two or three most influential philosophers before Socrates, was known as "the riddler" or "the obscure.")
    More quotations from: Heraclitus, fire
  • 36.
    Arguments are like fire-arms which a man may keep at home but should not carry about with him.
    (Samuel Butler (1835-1902), British author. Samuel Butler's Notebooks, p. 65 (1951).)
    More quotations from: Samuel Butler, fire, home
  • 37.
    In the right stage of the weather a pond fires its evening gun with great regularity.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 333, Houghton Mifflin (1906). Thoreau here refers specifically to nearby Flint's Pond in Concord.)
    More quotations from: Henry David Thoreau, weather
  • 38.
    How death-cold is literary genius before this fire of life!
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Character," Essays, Second Series (1844).)
  • 39.
    There is a slumbering subterranean fire in nature which never goes out, and which no cold can chill.
    (Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "A Winter Walk" (1843), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, p. 167, Houghton Mifflin (1906).)
  • 40.
    To awake your dormouse valor, to put fire in your heart, and brimstone in your liver.
    (William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Fabian, in Twelfth Night, act 3, sc. 2, l. 19-20. Trying to provoke Sir Andrew to challenge Cesario (Viola); "brimstone" means sulphur.)
    More quotations from: William Shakespeare, fire, heart
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