Quotations From ZORA NEALE HURSTON


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  • To me, bitterness is the under-arm odor of wishful weakness. It is the graceless acknowledgment of defeat.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, playwright and anthropologist. Dust Tracks on a Road, ch. 16, J.P. Lippincott (1942).
  • There is no single face in nature, because every eye that looks upon it, sees it from its own angle. So every mans spice-box seasons his own food.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, playwright and anthropologist. Dust Tracks on a Road, ch. 5, J.P. Lippincott (1942).

    Read more quotations about / on: food, nature
  • Love, I find is like singing. Everybody can do enough to satisfy themselves, though it may not impress the neighbors as being very much.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, playwright and anthropologist. Dust Tracks on a Road, ch. 14, J.P. Lippincott (1942).

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  • I have been in Sorrow's kitchen and licked out all the pots. Then I have stood on the peaky mountain wrapped in rainbows, with a harp and a sword in my hands.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, playwright and anthropologist. Dust Tracks on a Road, ch. 16, J.P. Lippincott (1942).

    Read more quotations about / on: sorrow
  • God took pattern after a pine tree and built you noble.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, playwright and anthropologist. Missie May, in "The Gilded Six Bits," Opportunity (1925), Spunk: The Selected Short Stories of Zora Neale Hurston (1988).

    Read more quotations about / on: tree, god
  • It's no use of talking unless people understand what you say.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, playwright and anthropologist. Ch. 11. Moses, in Moses Man of the Mountain, J.P. Lippincott (1939).

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  • He got a puzzlegut on 'im and he so chuckle-headed, he got a pone behind his neck.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, playwright and anthropologist. Missie May, in "The Gilded Six Bits," Opportunity (1925), Spunk: The Selected Short Stories of Zora Neale Hurston (1988).
  • You can tell 'em what Ah say if you wants to. Dat's just de same as me 'cause mah tongue is in mah friend's mouf.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, playwright and anthropologist. Janie, in Their Eyes Were Watching God, ch. 1, J.P. Lippincott (1937).

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  • Ah done been in sorrow's kitchen and Ah done licked out all de pots. Ah done died in grief and been buried in de bitter waters, and Ah done rose agin from de dead lak Lazarus.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, playwright and anthropologist. Lucy, in Jonah's Gourd Vine, ch. 2, J.B. Lippincott (1934).

    Read more quotations about / on: grief, sorrow, rose
  • You always strain tuh be de bell cow, never be de tail uh nothin'.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960), African-American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, playwright and anthropologist. Lucy, in Jonah's Gourd Vine, ch. 6, J.B. Lippincott (1934).
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