Quotations From WOODROW WILSON

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  • 31.
    My own ideals for the university are those of a genuine democracy and serious scholarship. These two, indeed, seem to go together.
    Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Letter, February 1, 1910, to Herbert B. Brougham. The Public Papers of Woodrow Wilson, vol. 20 p. 69, ed. Arthur S. Link.

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  • 32.
    Caution is the confidential agent of selfishness.
    Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. Democratic politician, president. speech, Feb. 12, 1909, Chicago.
  • 33.
    We ought to regard ourselves and to act as socialists—believers in the wholesomeness and beneficence of the body politic.
    Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Woodrow Wilson, The State (1889). The Public Papers of Woodrow Wilson, vol. 6, p. 303, ed. Arthur S. Link. Writing as a young college professor, Wilson disassociated himself from any specific socialist party. But he did not change this reference in the many subsequent reprintings of his book.
  • 34.
    Most men are individuals no longer so far as their business, its activities, or its moralities are concerned. They are not units but fractions.
    Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. Democratic politician, president. speech, Aug. 31, 1910, Chattanooga, Tenn.
  • 35.
    He would have been wise, perhaps, without her, but he would not have been wise so delightfully.
    Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. "A Literary Politician." Ray Stannard Baker, Woodrow Wilson: Life and Letters, vol. 1, p. 139.
  • 36.
    Once lead this people into war and they will forget there ever was such a thing as tolerance.
    Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. Democrat, president. quoted in Mr. Wilson's War, pt. 3, ch. 12, John Dos Passos (1917). See Wilson's comment on "World War I...."

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  • 37.
    The method of political science ... is the interpretation of life; its instrument is insight, a nice understanding of subtle, unformulated conditions.
    Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Letter, February 17, 1891, to Horace E. Scudder. Ray Stannard Baker, Woodrow Wilson: Life and Letters, vol. 2, p. 107.

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  • 38.
    It has become a people's war, and peoples of all sorts and races, of every degree of power and variety of fortune, are involved in its sweeping processes of change and settlement.
    Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Note to the Hungarian government (December 17, 1918).

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  • 39.
    It is the object of learning, not only to satisfy the curiosity and perfect the spirits of ordinary men, but also to advance civilization.
    Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Mere Literature and Other Essays, pp. 73-74, Houghton Mifflin (1896).

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  • 40.
    I am not sure that it is of the first importance that you should be happy. Many an unhappy man has been of deep service to himself and to the world.
    Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Baccalaureate address, June 7, 1908, at Princeton University. The Public Papers of Woodrow Wilson, vol. 18, p. 326, ed. Arthur S. Link. Wilson was speaking as a stern Calvinist. More interesting, he was reconciling himself to his own unhappiness, being at the time in the midst of a love affair.

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