Quotations From WILLIAM HAZLITT


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  • Old friendships are like meats served up repeatedly, cold, comfortless, and distasteful. The stomach turns against them.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. "On the Pleasure of Hating," The Plain Speaker (1826).

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  • I like a friend the better for having faults that one can talk about.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. "On the Pleasure of Hating," The Plain Speaker (1826).

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  • Taste is nothing but an enlarged capacity for receiving pleasure from works of imagination.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. "On Taste," Sketches and Essays (1839).

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  • No one ever approaches perfection except by stealth, and unknown to themselves.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. "On Taste," Sketches and Essays (1839).
  • Poetry is the universal language which the heart holds with nature and itself. He who has a contempt for poetry, cannot have much respect for himself, or for anything else.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. Lectures on the English Poets, "On Poetry in General," (1818).

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  • Without the aid of prejudice and custom, I should not be able to find my way across the room.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. "On Prejudice," Sketches and Essays (1839).

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