Quotations From WILLIAM HAZLITT


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  • Every man, in his own opinion, forms an exception to the ordinary rules of morality.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In The Complete Works Of William Hazlitt, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932). Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims, no. 305 (1823).
  • Modesty is the lowest of the virtues, and is a real confession of the deficiency it indicates. He who undervalues himself is justly undervalued by others.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. Table Talk, "On the Knowledge of Character," (1821-1822).
  • To a superior race of being the pretensions of mankind to extraordinary sanctity and virtue must seem ... ridiculous.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In The Complete Works Of William Hazlitt, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932). Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims, no. 191 (1823).
  • To think ill of mankind and not wish ill to them, is perhaps the highest wisdom and virtue.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In The Complete Works Of William Hazlitt, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932). Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims, no. 241 (1823).
  • We are not hypocrites in our sleep.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. The Plain Speaker, "On Dreams," (1826).

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  • To be remembered after we are dead, is but poor recompense for being treated with contempt while we are living.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims, no. 429 (1823), repr. In The Complete Works of William Hazlitt, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932).
  • The art of pleasing consists in being pleased.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. The Round Table, "On Manner," (1817).
  • To be remembered after we are dead, is but poor recompense for being treated with contempt while we are living.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In The Complete Works Of William Hazlitt, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932). Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims, no. 429 (1823).
  • Satirists gain the applause of others through fear, not through love.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In The Complete Works Of William Hazlitt, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932). Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims, no. 77 (1823).

    Read more quotations about / on: fear, love
  • There is a heroism in crime as well as in virtue. Vice and infamy have their altars and their religion.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In The Complete Works of William Hazlitt, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932). Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims, no. 354 (1823).
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