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Quotations From WILLIAM HAZLITT


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  • Reflection makes men cowards.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In The Complete Works Of William Hazlitt, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932). Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims, no. 228 (1823).
  • If we wish to know the force of human genius, we should read Shakespeare. If we wish to see the insignificance of human learning, we may study his commentators.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. First published in Edinburgh Magazine (July 1818). Table Talk, "On the Ignorance of the Learned," (1821-1822).
  • We find many things to which the prohibition of them constitutes the only temptation.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In The Complete Works Of William Hazlitt, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932). Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims, no. 140 (1823).
  • The soul of a journey is liberty, perfect liberty, to think, feel, do just as one pleases.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. Table Talk, "On Going a Journey," (1821-1822).

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  • Envy among other ingredients has a mixture of the love of justice in it. We are more angry at undeserved than at deserved good-fortune.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. in Complete Works, vol. 9. Ed. P.P. Howe (1932). Characteristics, no. 19, first published anonymously (1823).

    Read more quotations about / on: justice, love
  • The English (it must be owned) are rather a foul-mouthed nation.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. Table Talk, "On Criticism," (1821-1822).
  • Our friends are generally ready to do everything for us, except the very thing we wish them to do.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In Complete Works, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932). Characteristics, no. 87 (1823). First published anonymously.
  • There is not a more mean, stupid, dastardly, pitiful, selfish, spiteful, envious, ungrateful animal than the Public. It is the greatest of cowards, for it is afraid of itself.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. Table Talk, "On Living to One's Self," (1821-1822).

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  • An honest man speaks the truth, though it may give offence; a vain man, in order that it may.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In Complete Works, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932). Characteristics, no. 387, first published anonymously (1823).

    Read more quotations about / on: truth
  • The English (it must be owned) are rather a foul-mouthed nation.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. Table Talk, "On Criticism," (1821-1822).
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