Learn More

Quotations From WILLIAM HAZLITT


» More about William Hazlitt on Poemhunter

 

  • To be remembered after we are dead, is but poor recompense for being treated with contempt while we are living.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims, no. 429 (1823), repr. In The Complete Works of William Hazlitt, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932).
  • We are not hypocrites in our sleep.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. The Plain Speaker, "On Dreams," (1826).

    Read more quotations about / on: sleep
  • To think ill of mankind and not wish ill to them, is perhaps the highest wisdom and virtue.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In The Complete Works Of William Hazlitt, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932). Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims, no. 241 (1823).
  • To a superior race of being the pretensions of mankind to extraordinary sanctity and virtue must seem ... ridiculous.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In The Complete Works Of William Hazlitt, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932). Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims, no. 191 (1823).
  • Modesty is the lowest of the virtues, and is a real confession of the deficiency it indicates. He who undervalues himself is justly undervalued by others.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. Table Talk, "On the Knowledge of Character," (1821-1822).
  • Every man, in his own opinion, forms an exception to the ordinary rules of morality.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In The Complete Works Of William Hazlitt, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932). Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims, no. 305 (1823).
  • Modesty is the lowest of the virtues, and is a real confession of the deficiency it indicates. He who undervalues himself is justly undervalued by others.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. Table Talk, "On the Knowledge of Character," (1821-1822).
  • The true barbarian is he who thinks everything barbarous but his own tastes and prejudices.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In The Complete Works Of William Hazlitt, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932). Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims, no. 333 (1823).
  • A grave blockhead should always go about with a lively one—they shew one another off to the best advantage.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In The Complete Works Of William Hazlitt, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932). Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims, no. 376 (1823).
  • If we wish to know the force of human genius, we should read Shakespeare. If we wish to see the insignificance of human learning, we may study his commentators.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. First published in Edinburgh Magazine (July 1818). Table Talk, "On the Ignorance of the Learned," (1821-1822).
[Hata Bildir]