Quotations From WILLIAM HAZLITT


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  • Few things tend more to alienate friendship than a want of punctuality in our engagements. I have known the breach of a promise to dine or sup to break up more than one intimacy.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In The Plain Speaker (1826). "On the Spirit of Obligations," (1824).
  • No truly great man ever thought himself so.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. in Collected Works, vol. 11, eds. A.R. Waller and Arnold Glover (1904). "Common Places," no. 20, Literary Examiner (London, Sept. 13, 1823).
  • We find many things to which the prohibition of them constitutes the only temptation.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims, no. 140 (1823), repr. In The Complete Works Of William Hazlitt, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932).
  • It is well that there is no one without a fault; for he would not have a friend in the world.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In The Complete Works of William Hazlitt, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932). Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims, no. 66 (1823).

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  • We can bear to be deprived of everything but our self-conceit.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In The Complete Works Of William Hazlitt, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932). Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims, no. 421 (1823).
  • There is no one thoroughly despicable. We cannot descend much lower than an idiot; and an idiot has some advantages over a wise man.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In The Complete Works Of William Hazlitt, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932). Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims, no. 222 (1823).
  • There is a heroism in crime as well as in virtue. Vice and infamy have their altars and their religion.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In The Complete Works of William Hazlitt, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932). Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims, no. 354 (1823).
  • Satirists gain the applause of others through fear, not through love.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In The Complete Works Of William Hazlitt, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932). Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims, no. 77 (1823).

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  • To be remembered after we are dead, is but poor recompense for being treated with contempt while we are living.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In The Complete Works Of William Hazlitt, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932). Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims, no. 429 (1823).
  • The art of pleasing consists in being pleased.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. The Round Table, "On Manner," (1817).
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