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Quotations From WILLIAM HAZLITT

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  • 11.
    Poetry is the universal language which the heart holds with nature and itself. He who has a contempt for poetry, cannot have much respect for himself, or for anything else.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. "On Poetry in General," Lectures on the English Poets (1818).

    Read more quotations about / on: poetry, respect, heart, nature
  • 12.
    He is to the great poet, what an excellent mimic is to a great actor. There is no determinate impression left on the mind by reading his poetry.... A great mind is one that moulds the minds of others.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. "On the Living Poets," Lectures on the English Poets (1818). Of Sir Walter Scott.

    Read more quotations about / on: poetry
  • 13.
    There is an unseemly exposure of the mind, as well as of the body.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. Sketches and Essays, "On Disagreeable People," (1839). The philosopher and statesman Francis Bacon had expressed a similar idea in his essay "Of Simulation and Dissimulation": "Nakedness is uncomely, as well in mind as in body."
  • 14.
    The most sensible people to be met with in society are men of business and of the world, who argue from what they see and know, instead of spinning cobweb distinctions of what things ought to be.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In Table Talk (1821). "On the Ignorance of the Learned," Edinburgh Magazine (July 1818).

    Read more quotations about / on: people, world
  • 15.
    Modesty is the lowest of the virtues, and is a real confession of the deficiency it indicates. He who undervalues himself is justly undervalued by others.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. "On the Knowledge of Character," vol. 2, Table Talk (1822).
  • 16.
    It is not the passion of a mind struggling with misfortune, or the hopelessness of its desires, but of a mind preying on itself, and disgusted with, or indifferent to all other things.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. "On the Living Poets," Lectures on the English Poets (1818). Commenting on Byron's poetry.

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  • 17.
    Lest he should wander irretrievably from the right path, he stands still.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. "On the Living Poets," Lectures on the English Poets (1818). Of the poet Thomas Campbell.
  • 18.
    The least pain in our little finger gives us more concern and uneasiness than the destruction of millions of our fellow-beings.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. Complete Works, vol. 16, ed. P.P. Howe (1932). American Literature Dr. Channing, first published in Edinburgh Review (Oct. 1829).

    Read more quotations about / on: pain
  • 19.
    There is an unseemly exposure of the mind, as well as of the body.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. Sketches and Essays, "On Disagreeable People," (1839). The philosopher and statesman Francis Bacon had expressed a similar idea in his essay "Of Simulation and Dissimulation": "Nakedness is uncomely, as well in mind as in body."
  • 20.
    There is no prejudice so strong as that which arises from a fancied exemption from all prejudice.
    William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. "On the Tendency of Sects," The Round Table (1817).

    Read more quotations about / on: prejudice
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