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Quotations From VIRGINIA WOOLF

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  • 11.
    Who shall measure the heat and violence of the poet's heart when caught and tangled in a woman's body?
    Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), British novelist. A Room of One's Own, ch. 3 (1929). Woolf added: "The indifference of the world which Keats and Flaubert and other men of genius have found so hard to bear was in her case not indifference but hostility. The world did not say to her as it said to them, Write if you choose; it makes no difference to me. The world said with a guffaw, Write? What's the good of you writing?"

    Read more quotations about / on: heart, woman
  • 12.
    This soul, or life within us, by no means agrees with the life outside us. If one has the courage to ask her what she thinks, she is always saying the very opposite to what other people say.
    Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), British novelist. "Montaigne," The Common Reader, First Series (1925).

    Read more quotations about / on: courage, life, people
  • 13.
    Life is not a series of gig lamps symmetrically arranged; life is a luminous halo, a semi-transparent envelope surrounding us from the beginning of consciousness to the end.
    Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), British novelist. "Modern Fiction," The Common Reader, First Series (1925).

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  • 14.
    Humour is the first of the gifts to perish in a foreign tongue.
    Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), British novelist. The Common Reader, "On Not Knowing Greek," First Series (1925).
  • 15.
    It seems as if an age of genius must be succeeded by an age of endeavour; riot and extravagance by cleanliness and hard work.
    Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), British novelist, essayist, and diarist. The Common Reader, ch. 21 (1925).

    Read more quotations about / on: work
  • 16.
    We are nauseated by the sight of trivial personalities decomposing in the eternity of print.
    Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), British novelist. The Common Reader, "The Modern Essay," First Series (1925). Referring to inferior essayists.
  • 17.
    Middlemarch, the magnificent book which with all its imperfections is one of the few English novels for grown-up people.
    Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), British novelist. The Common Reader, "George Eliot," First Series (1925).

    Read more quotations about / on: people
  • 18.
    I was in a queer mood, thinking myself very old: but now I am a woman again—as I always am when I write.
    Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), British novelist. The Diary of Virginia Woolf, vol. 3, entry for May 31, 1929, ed. Anne O. Bell (1980).

    Read more quotations about / on: woman
  • 19.
    A masterpiece is ... something said once and for all, stated, finished, so that it's there complete in the mind, if only at the back.
    Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), British novelist. Letter, January 1, 1933. Published in The Sickle Side of the Moon: Letters, vol. 5, ed. Nigel Nicolson (1979).
  • 20.
    Boredom is the legitimate kingdom of the philanthropic.
    Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), British novelist. Letter, September 10, 1918. The Diary of Virginia Woolf, vol. 1, ed. Anne O. Bell (1977).
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