Quotations From THOMAS MANN

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  • 11.
    For the beautiful word begets the beautiful deed.
    Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. Originally published as Der Zauberberg, Fischer (1924). The Magic Mountain, ch. 4, p. 159, trans. by Helen T. Lowe-Porter, The Modern Library, McGraw-Hill (1955). Settembrini's credo.

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  • 12.
    One always has the idea of a stupid man as perfectly healthy and ordinary, and of illness as making one refined and clever and unusual.
    Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. Originally published as Der Zauberberg, Fischer (1924). The Magic Mountain, ch. 4, p. 97, trans. by Helen T. Lowe-Porter, The Modern Library, McGraw-Hill (1955). Hans Castorp's decadent notion of disease.
  • 13.
    Never had he felt the joy of the word more sweetly, never had he known so clearly that Eros dwells in language.
    Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. originally published in "Die Neue Rundschau" 23, Oct. and Nov. 1912. Death in Venice, ch. 4, p. 236, trans. by David Luke, Bantam Classic (1988). Gustav Aschenbach's (the novella's main protagonist) rapture to write in view of his idol Tadzio.

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  • 14.
    How else is the famous short story 'A study in Abjection' to be understood but as an outbreak of disgust against an age indecently undermined by psychology.
    Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. originally published in "Die Neue Rundschau" 23, Oct. and Nov. 1912. Death in Venice, ch. 2, p. 204, trans. by David Luke, Bantam Classic (1988). This short story, attributed to Gustav Aschenbach, the novella's main protagonist, is Thomas Mann's most explicit criticism of early Freudian psychoanalysis.
  • 15.
    Everything is politics.
    Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. Originally published as Der Zauberberg, Fischer (1924). The Magic Mountain, ch. 6, p. 515, trans. by Helen T. Lowe-Porter, The Modern Library, McGraw-Hill (1955).
  • 16.
    Politics has been called the "art of the possible," and it actually is a realm akin to art insofar as, like art, it occupies a creatively mediating position between spirit and life, the idea and reality.
    Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. first complete publication as Deutschland und die Deutschen in "Die Neue Rundschau," Stockholm, Heft 1, Oct. 1945. Germany and the Germans, p. 58, trans. by Helen T. Lowe-Porter, Library of Congress (1963). Thomas Mann delivered this address in the Library of Congress, May 29, 1945.

    Read more quotations about / on: life
  • 17.
    There is something suspicious about music, gentlemen. I insist that she is, by her nature, equivocal. I shall not be going too far in saying at once that she is politically suspect.
    Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. Herr Settembrini, in The Magic Mountain, ch. 4, "Politically Suspect," (1924), trans. by H.T. Lowe-Porter (1928).

    Read more quotations about / on: music, nature
  • 18.
    Every reasonable human being should be a moderate Socialist.
    Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. New York Times (June 18, 1950), quoted in R.J. Hollingdale, Thomas Mann: A Critical Study, ch. 2 (1971).
  • 19.
    The Freudian theory is one of the most important foundation stones for an edifice to be built by future generations, the dwelling of a freer and wiser humanity.
    Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. New York Times (June 21, 1939).

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  • 20.
    In effect it seemed to him that, though honor might possess certain advantages, yet shame had others, and not inferior: advantages, even, that were well-nigh boundless in their scope.
    Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. Originally published as Der Zauberberg, Fischer (1924). The Magic Mountain, ch. 3, p. 81, trans. by Helen T. Lowe-Porter, The Modern Library, McGraw-Hill (1955). Hans Castorp's fascination with the advantages of shame.
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