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Quotations From THOMAS MANN

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  • 1.
    Why does almost everything seem to me like its own parody? Why must I think that almost all, no, all the methods and conventions of art today are good for parody only?
    Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. Originally published as Doktor Faustus, Fischer (1947). Adrian Leverkühn, in Doctor Faustus, ch. 15, p. 134, trans. by Helen T. Lowe-Porter, Vintage Books, Random House (1948).

    Read more quotations about / on: today
  • 2.
    This longing for the bliss of the commonplace.
    Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. originally published in Tristan. Sechs Novellen, Fischer (1903). Tonio Kröger, ch. 4, p. 161 and ch. 9, p. 191, trans. by David Luke, Bantam Classic (1988). In German culture this phrase has become proverbial for the artist's and intellectual's longing for everything simple and healthy.
  • 3.
    Because it often happens that an old family, with traditions that are entirely practical, sober and bourgeois, undergoes in its declining days a kind of artistic transfiguration.
    Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. originally published in Tristan. Sechs Novellen, Fischer (1903). Tristan, ch. 7, p. 108, trans. by David Luke, Bantam Classic (1988).

    Read more quotations about / on: family
  • 4.
    That swamp of impropriety ... in ... which two civilized beings will behave like cannibals.
    Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. Originally published as Bekenntnisse des Hochstaplers Felix Krull, Fischer (1954). Confessions of Felix Krull, Confidence Man, bk. 3, ch. 10, p. 348, trans. by Denver Lindley, Vintage Books (1955). Zouou's circumscription for sexual intercourse while fending of Felix Krull's amorous advances.
  • 5.
    The writer's joy is the thought that can become emotion, the emotion that can wholly become a thought.
    Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. originally published in "Die Neue Rundschau" 23, Oct. and Nov. 1912. Death in Venice, ch. 4, p. 235, trans. by David Luke, Bantam Classic (1988).

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  • 6.
    Hans Castorp loved music from his heart; it worked upon him much the same way as did his breakfast porter, with deeply soothing, narcotic effect, tempting him to doze.
    Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. Originally published as Der Zauberberg, Fischer (1924). The Magic Mountain, ch. 3, p. 38, trans. by Helen T. Lowe-Porter, The Modern Library, McGraw-Hill (1955).

    Read more quotations about / on: music, heart
  • 7.
    But my deepest and most secret love belongs to the fair-haired and the blue-eyed, the bright children of life, the happy, the charming and the ordinary.
    Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. originally published in Tristan. Sechs Novellen, Fischer (1903). Tonio Kröger, ch. 9, p. 192, trans. by David Luke, Bantam Classic (1988). Tonio Kröger's decadent yearning for an Aryan ideal.

    Read more quotations about / on: blue, happy, children, love, life
  • 8.
    Unhappy German nation, how do you like the Messianic rôle allotted to you, not by God, nor by destiny, but by a handful of perverted and bloody-minded men.
    Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. Order of the Day (1942). "This War," (1939).

    Read more quotations about / on: destiny, god
  • 9.
    What we call National-Socialism is the poisonous perversion of ideas which have a long history in German intellectual life.
    Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. Speech delivered in 1940. "The War and the Future," Order of the Day (1942).

    Read more quotations about / on: history, life
  • 10.
    Asia surrounds us—wherever one's glance rests, a Tartar physiognomy.
    Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. Originally published as Der Zauberberg, Fischer (1924). The Magic Mountain, ch. 5, p. 241, trans. by Helen T. Lowe-Porter, The Modern Library, McGraw-Hill (1955). Settembrini articulates here in exaggerated terms the contemporary European fear of Asia. The German original Asien verschlingt uns is even stronger in its meaning of "Asia swallows us up."
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