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Quotations From THOMAS JEFFERSON

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  • 121.
    The moment a person forms a theory, his imagination sees in every object only the tracts which favor that theory.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), U.S. president. Letter, September 20, 1787, to Charles Thompson. The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 12, p. 159, ed. Julian P. Boyd, et al. (1950).

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  • 122.
    As our enemies have found we can reason like men, so now let us show them we can fight like men also.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), U.S. president. Letter, July 5, 1775, to George Gilmer. The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 1, p. 186, ed. Julian P. Boyd, et al. (1950).
  • 123.
    I am savage enough to prefer the woods, the wilds, and the independence of Monticello, to all the brilliant pleasures of this gay capital [Paris].
    Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), U.S. president. Letter, September 6, 1785, to Geismar. The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 8, p. 500, ed. Julian P. Boyd, et al. (1950).

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  • 124.
    I steer my bark with Hope in the head, leaving Fear astern.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), U.S. president. Letter, April 8, 1816, to John Adams. The Adams-Jefferson Letters, vol. 2, p. 467, ed. Lester J. Cappon (1959).

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  • 125.
    It is error alone which needs the support of government. Truth can stand by itself.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), U.S. president. Notes on the State of Virginia (1787), Query 17, p. 160, ed. William Peden (1954).

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  • 126.
    The cutting of heads is become so much a la mode, that one is apt to feel of a morning whether their own is on their shoulders.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), U.S. president. Letter, July 25, 1789, to Maria Cosway. The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 15, p. 305, ed. Julian P. Boyd, et al. (1950).
  • 127.
    The difficulty is no longer to find candidates for the offices, but offices for the candidates.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), U.S. president. Letter, September 17, 1792, to John Syme. The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 24, p. 388, ed. Julian P. Boyd, et al. (1950).
  • 128.
    We do not mean to count or weigh our contributions by any standard other than that of our abilities.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), U.S. president. Letter, October 15, 1780, to Thomas Burke. The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 4, p. 39, ed. Julian P. Boyd, et al. (1950). Requests from the Second Continental Congress for money the state does not have.
  • 129.
    Health, learning and virtue will ensure your happiness; they will give you a quiet conscience, private esteem and public honour.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), U.S. president. Letter, August 6, 1788, to Peter Carr. The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 13, p. 470, ed. Julian P. Boyd, et al. (1950).

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  • 130.
    Ignorance is preferable to error; and he is less remote from the truth who believes nothing, than he who believes what is wrong.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), U.S. president. Notes on the State of Virginia (1787), Query 6, p. 33, ed. William Peden (1954).

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