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Quotations From THOMAS JEFFERSON

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  • 91.
    [Tobacco] is a culture productive of infinite wretchedness.... The cultivation of wheat is the reverse in every circumstance.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), U.S. president. Notes on the State of Virginia (1787), Query 20, pp. 167-168, ed. William Peden (1954).

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  • 92.
    The bloom of Monticello is chilled by my solitude.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), U.S. president. Letter, March 27, 1797, to his daughter, Martha Jefferson Randolph. The Family Letters of Thomas Jefferson, p. 142, eds. E.M. Betts and J.A. Bear, Jr. (1966).

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  • 93.
    Do not write me studied letters but ramble as you please.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), U.S. president. Letter, March 14, 1816, to his granddaughter, Ellen Wayles Randolph. The Family Letters of Thomas Jefferson, p. 412, eds. E.M. Betts and J.A. Bear, Jr. (1966).
  • 94.
    [E]very thing is useful which contributes to fix us in the principles and practice of virtue.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), U.S. president. Letter, August 3, 1771, to Robert Skipwith. The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 1, p. 76, ed. Julian P. Boyd, et al. (1950).
  • 95.
    The art of life is the art of avoiding pain; and he is the best pilot, who steers clearest of the rocks and shoals with which it is beset.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), U.S. president. Letter, October 12, 1786, to Maria Cosway.

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  • 96.
    Be a listener only, keep within yourself, and endeavor to establish with yourself the habit of silence, especially in politics.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), U.S. president. Letter, November 24, 1808, to his grandson, Thomas Jefferson Randolph. The Family Letters of Thomas Jefferson, p. 364, eds. E.M. Betts and J.A. Bear, Jr. (1966).

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  • 97.
    The great cause which divides our countries is not to be decided by individual animosities. The harmony of private societies cannot weaken national efforts.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), U.S. president. Letter, 1779, to William Phillips. The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 2, p. 261, ed. Julian P. Boyd, et al. (1950).
  • 98.
    While old men feel sensibly enough their own advance in years, they do not sufficiently recollect it in those whom they have seen young.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), U.S. president. Letter, January 3, 1793, to William Short. The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 25, p. 15, ed. Julian P. Boyd, et al. (1950).
  • 99.
    Civil government being the sole object of forming societies, its administration must be conducted by common consent.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), U.S. president. Notes on the State of Virginia (1787), Query 8, p. 84, ed. William Peden (1954).
  • 100.
    Determine never to be idle. No person will have occasion to complain of the want of time, who never loses any. It is wonderful how much may be done, if we are always doing.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), U.S. president. Letter, May 5, 1787, to his daughter, Martha Jefferson. The Family Letters of Thomas Jefferson, p. 40, eds. E.M. Betts and J.A. Bear, Jr. (1966).

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