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Quotations From SAMUEL RICHARDSON

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  • 41.
    Of what violences, murders, depredations, have not the epic poets, from all antiquity, been the occasion, by propagating false honor, false glory, and false religion?
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). Charlotte Grandison, in Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 6, letter 45, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).

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  • 42.
    Where words are restrained, the eyes often talk a great deal.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 5, p. 275, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).
  • 43.
    There hardly can be a greater difference between any two men, than there too often is, between the same man, a lover and a husband.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). Charlotte Grandison, in Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 4, letter 17, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).

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  • 44.
    A good man will not engage even in a national cause, without examining the justice of it.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). Sir Charles Grandison, in Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 2, letter 3, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).

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  • 45.
    Men know no medium: They will either, spaniel-like, fawn at your feet, or be ready to leap into your lap.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). Charlotte Grandison, in Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 3, letter 23, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).
  • 46.
    The Cause of Women is generally the Cause of Virtue.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. letter, Jan. 22, 1749/50, to Frances Grainger. Selected Letters of Samuel Richardson, ed. John Carroll (1964).

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  • 47.
    It is much easier to find fault with others, than to be faultless ourselves.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 6, p. 343, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).
  • 48.
    To what a bad choice is many a worthy woman betrayed, by that false and inconsiderate notion, That a reformed rake makes the best husband!
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Belford, in Clarissa, vol. 8, p. 61, AMS Press (1990). One of Richardson's declared intentions in writing Clarissa was to expose the falseness of the notion That a reformed rake makes the best husband by revealing the essential contempt for women necessarily held by habitual rakes. See his Preface to Clarissa, vol. 1, p.viii.

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  • 49.
    Men will bear many things from a kept mistress, which they would not bear from a wife.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Belford, in Clarissa, vol. 4, p. 134, AMS Press (1990).
  • 50.
    Friendship is the perfection of love, and superior to love; it is love purified, exalted, proved by experience and a consent of minds. Love, Madam, may, and love does, often stop short of friendship.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. letter, Sept. 30, 1751, to Hester Mulso. Selected Letters of Samuel Richardson, ed. John Carroll (1964).

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