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Quotations From SAMUEL RICHARDSON

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  • Superstitious notions propagated in infancy are hardly ever totally eradicated, not even in minds grown strong enough to despise the like credulous folly in others.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Clarissa, in Clarissa, vol. 2, p. 283, AMS Press (1990).
  • A good man, though he will value his own countrymen, yet will think as highly of the worthy men of every nation under the sun.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). Sir Charles Grandison, in Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 3, letter 29, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).

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  • Women's eyes are wanderers, and too often bring home guests that are very troublesome to them, and whom, once introduced, they cannot get out of the house.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). Sir Charles Grandison, in Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 3, letter 2, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).

    Read more quotations about / on: house, home, women
  • Necessity may well be called the mother of invention—but calamity is the test of integrity.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Clarissa, in Clarissa, vol. 7, pp. 201-2, AMS Press (1990).

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  • In all Works of This, and of the Dramatic Kind, STORY, or AMUSEMENT, should be considered as little more than the Vehicle to the more necessary INSTRUCTION.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1747). Clarissa, preface.
  • What pity that Religion and Love, which heighten our relish for the things of both worlds, should ever run the human heart into enthusiasm, superstition, or uncharitableness!
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). Sir Charles Grandison, in Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 3, letter 28, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).

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  • Married people should not be quick to hear what is said by either when in ill humor.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). Sir Charles Grandison, in Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 4, letter 4, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).

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  • Marriage is a state that is attended with so much care and trouble, that it is a kind of faulty indulgence and selfishness to live single, in order to avoid the difficulties it is attended with.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). Sir Charles Grandison, in Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 7, letter 27, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).

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  • There would be no supporting life were we to feel quite as poignantly for others as we do for ourselves.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). Charlotte Grandison, in Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 2, p. 164, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).

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  • Would Alexander, madman as he was, have been so much a madman, had it not been for Homer?
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). Charlotte Grandison, in Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 6, letter 45, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).
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