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Quotations From SAMUEL RICHARDSON

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  • 101.
    Every scholar, I presume, is not, necessarily, a man of sense.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). Harriet Byron, in Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 1, letter 12, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).
  • 102.
    Men generally are afraid of a wife who has more understanding than themselves.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). Harriet Byron, in Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 1, letter 12, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).
  • 103.
    The mind can be but full. It will be as much filled with a small disagreeable occurrence, having no other, as with a large one.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). Henrietta Shirley, in Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 6, letter 46, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).
  • 104.
    A husband's mother and his wife had generally better be visitors than inmates.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). Lady D., in Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 2, letter 5, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).

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  • 105.
    The little words in the Republic of Letters, like the little folks in a nation, are the most useful and significant.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Lovelace in Clarissa, vol. 4, p. 275, AMS Press (1990).
  • 106.
    All our pursuits, from childhood to manhood, are only trifles of different sorts and sizes, proportioned to our years and views.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Lovelace, in Clarissa, vol. 4, p. 263, AMS Press (1990).

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  • 107.
    Those who can least bear a jest upon themselves, will be most diverted with one passed on others.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Lovelace, in Clarissa, vol. 7, p. 141, AMS Press (1990).
  • 108.
    Let a man do what he will by a single woman, the world is encouragingly apt to think Marriage a sufficient amends.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Lovelace, in Clarissa, vol. 6, p. 52, AMS Press (1990).

    Read more quotations about / on: marriage, woman, world
  • 109.
    People of little understanding are most apt to be angry when their sense is called into question.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Lovelace, in Clarissa, vol. 8, p. 152, AMS Press (1990).

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  • 110.
    People who act like angels ought to have angels to deal with.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Lovelace, in Clarissa, vol. 2, p. 177, AMS Press (1990).

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