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Quotations From SAMUEL RICHARDSON

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  • Parents sometimes make not those allowances for youth, which, when young, they wished to be made for themselves.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Clarissa, in Clarissa, vol. 2, p. 78, AMS Press (1990).

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  • There are men who think themselves too wise to be religious.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Clarissa, in Clarissa, vol. 2, p. 196, AMS Press (1990).
  • A good man will honor him who lives up to his religious profession, whatever it be.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). Sir Charles Grandison, in Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 2, letter 3, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).
  • Every one, more or less, loves Power, yet those who most wish for it are seldom the fittest to be trusted with it.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Clarissa, in Clarissa, vol. 1, p. 124, AMS Press (1990).

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  • Some children act as if they thought their parents had nothing to do, but to see them established in the world and then quit it.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). Sir Thomas Grandison, in Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 2, p. 170, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).

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  • It may be very generous in one person to offer what it would be ungenerous in another to accept.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Clarissa, in Clarissa, vol. 6, p. 305, AMS Press (1990).
  • Whom we fear more than love, we are not far from hating.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Clarissa, in Clarissa, vol. 1, p. 20, AMS Press (1990).

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  • Great allowances ought to be made for the petulance of persons laboring under ill-health.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Clarissa, in Clarissa, vol. 1, p. 180, AMS Press (1990).
  • Marry first, and love will come after is a shocking assertion; since a thousand things may happen to make the state but barely tolerable, when it is entered into with mutual affection.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. Third edition, London (1751). Clarissa, in Clarissa, vol. 1, p. 208, AMS Press (1990).

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  • The World, thinking itself affronted by superior merit, takes delight to bring it down to its own level.
    Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), British novelist. First edition, London (1753-1754). Harriet Byron, in Sir Charles Grandison, vol. 1, letter 36, Oxford University Press (1972, repr. 1986).

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