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Quotations From SAMUEL JOHNSON

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  • 191.
    Read your own compositions, and when you meet with a passage which you think is particularly fine, strike it out.
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Dr. Johnson, entry, April 30, 1773 (1791). Quoting a college tutor.
  • 192.
    By taking a second wife he pays the highest compliment to the first, by shewing that she made him so happy as a married man, that he wishes to be so a second time.
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, Sept. 30, 1769 (1791). On another occasion (1770), Johnson described the remarriage of "a gentleman who had been very unhappy in marriage" as "the triumph of hope over experience."

    Read more quotations about / on: happy, time
  • 193.
    "Mr. Johnson, (said I) I do indeed come from Scotland, but I cannot help it".... "That, Sir, I find is what a great many of your countrymen cannot help."
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. (Originally published 1791). Boswell's Life of Johnson, May 16, 1763, p. 277, Oxford University Press (1980).
  • 194.
    Our tastes greatly alter. The lad does not care for the child's rattle, and the old man does not care for the young man's whore.
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, spring 1776 (1791).

    Read more quotations about / on: child
  • 195.
    It seems not more reasonable to leave the right of printing unrestrained, because writers may be afterwards censured, than it would be to sleep with doors unbolted, because by our laws we can hang a thief.
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. "Milton," Lives of the English Poets (1779-1781). Discussing Milton's Areopagitica.

    Read more quotations about / on: sleep, leave
  • 196.
    Our brightest blazes of gladness are commonly kindled by unexpected sparks.
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. repr. in Works of Samuel Johnson, vol. 2, eds. W.J. Bate, John M. Bullitt, and L.F. Powell (1963). The Idler, no. 58, Universal Chronicle (London, May 26, 1759).
  • 197.
    There may be other reasons for a man's not speaking in publick than want of resolution: he may have nothing to say.
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, April 5, 1775 (1791).
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