Quotations From SAMUEL JOHNSON

» More about Samuel Johnson on Poemhunter

 

  • I would rather be attacked than unnoticed. For the worst thing you can do to an author is to be silent as to his works. An assault upon a town is a bad thing; but starving it is still worse.
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, March 26, 1779 entry (1791).
  • I am always sorry when any language is lost, because languages are the pedigree of nations.
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Tour to the Hebrides, September 18, 1773 (1785).

    Read more quotations about / on: sorry, lost
  • The triumph of hope over experience.
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Dr. Johnson, entry, 1770 (1791). Referring to the remarriage of "a gentleman who had been very unhappy in marriage." On a different note, Johnson had stated on another occasion (Sept. 30, 1769), "By taking a second wife he pays the highest compliment to the first, by shewing that she made him so happy as a married man, that he wishes to be so a second time."

    Read more quotations about / on: hope
  • Every quotation contributes something to the stability or enlargement of the language.
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Dictionary of the English Language, preface (1755).
  • I have always considered it as treason against the great republic of human nature, to make any man's virtues the means of deceiving him.
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Rasselas, in The History of Rasselas, ch. 46 (1759).

    Read more quotations about / on: nature
  • Love is the wisdom of the fool and the folly of the wise.
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. quoted in William Cooke, Life of Samuel Foote, vol. 2, repr. In Johnsonian Miscellanies, vol. 2, p. 393, ed. George Birkbeck Hill (1897).

    Read more quotations about / on: love
  • Nothing odd will do long. Tristram Shandy did not last.
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. (Originally published 1791). Boswell's Life of Johnson, March 21, 1776, p. 696, Oxford University Press (1980).
  • No man is by nature the property of another. The defendant is, therefore, by nature free.
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. (Originally published 1791). Boswell's Life of Johnson, September 23, 1777, p. 878, Oxford University Press (1980). Comment on legal case concerning a Jamaican slave.

    Read more quotations about / on: nature
  • Every man has a right to utter what he thinks truth, and every other man has a right to knock him down for it. Martyrdom is the test.
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Dr. Johnson, entry, 1780 (1791). As quoted by Mr. Langton.

    Read more quotations about / on: truth
  • Politics are now nothing more than means of rising in the world. With this sole view do men engage in politics, and their whole conduct proceeds upon it.
    Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), British author, lexicographer. Quoted in James Boswell, Life of Samuel Johnson, April 17, 1775 entry (1791).

    Read more quotations about / on: world
[Hata Bildir]