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Quotations From SAMUEL BECKETT

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  • 141.
    The mind too closes as it were. As the window might close of a dark empty room.
    Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. The narrator, in Company, p. 23, Grove Press (1980).

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  • 142.
    He moved with the shades of the dead and the dead-born and the unborn and the never-to-be-born, in a Limbo purged of desire.
    Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. Beckett's first novel; published after the author's death. The narrator, in Dream of Fair to Middling Women, p. 44, The Black Cat Press, Dublin (1992).
  • 143.
    Do they [the publishers of Murphy] not understand that if the book is slightly obscure it is because it is a compression and that to compress it further can only make it more obscure?
    Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. Disjecta, p. 103, Grove Press (1984). From a letter to George Reavey dated November 13, 1936.
  • 144.
    We all are born mad. Some remain so.
    Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. Estragon, in Waiting for Godot, act 2 (1952, trans. 1954).
  • 145.
    I gave up before birth.
    Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. The narrator, in "Fizzle 4," Fizzles, p. 31, Grove Press (1976).

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  • 146.
    Imagination at wit's end spreads its sad wings.
    Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. The narrator, in Ill Seen Ill Said, p. 17, Grove Press (1981).

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  • 147.
    With all this darkness round me I feel less alone.
    Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. First edition, 1958. Krapp, in Krapp's Last Tape, pp. 14-15, Grove Press (1960).

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  • 148.
    We lay there without moving. But under us all moved, and moved us, gently, up and down, and from side to side.
    Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. First edition, 1958. Krapp, in Krapp's Last Tape, pp. 23, Grove Press (1960).
  • 149.
    Lick your neighbor as yourself!
    Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. Hamm, in Endgame, p. 68, Grove Press (1958). based on Leviticus 18:19 and Matthew 19:19: "Thou shalt love thy neighbor as yourself."
  • 150.
    Dear incomprehension, it's thanks to you I'll be myself, in the end.
    Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish dramatist, novelist. First published in 1958. The narrator, in The Unnamable, p. 51, Grove Press (1970).

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