Quotations From RALPH WALDO EMERSON

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  • 21.
    The learned and the studious of thought have no monopoly of wisdom. Their violence of direction in some degree disqualifies them to think truly.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "The Over-Soul," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).
  • 22.
    Best masters for the young writer and speaker are the fault- finding brothers and sisters at home who will not spare him, but will pick and cavil, and tell the odious truth.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. The Journals of Ralph Waldo Emerson, vol. 10, ed. Edward Everett Emerson (1909-1914).

    Read more quotations about / on: home, truth
  • 23.
    Could Shakespeare give a theory of Shakespeare?
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Spiritual Laws," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847). Emerson's rhetorical answer is, no he could not. This quotation is therefore a gloss on Emerson's theory of action and its dialectical relationship to theory and reflection.
  • 24.
    I do not speak with any fondness but the language of coolest history, when I say that Boston commands attention as the town which was appointed in the destiny of nations to lead the civilization of North America.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Boston," The Natural History of the Intellect (1893).

    Read more quotations about / on: destiny, america, history
  • 25.
    Let us not be too much acquainted. I would have a man enter his house through a hall filled with heroic and sacred sculptures, that he might not want the hint of tranquillity and self-poise.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Manners," Essays, Second Series (1844).

    Read more quotations about / on: house
  • 26.
    Man moves in all modes, by legs of horses, by wings of winds, by steam, by gas of balloon, by electricity, and stands on tiptoe threatening to hunt the eagle in his own element.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Fate," The Conduct of Life (1860).
  • 27.
    The longer we live the more we must endure the elementary existence of men and women; and every brave heart must treat society as a child, and never allow it to dictate.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Culture," The Conduct of Life (1860).

    Read more quotations about / on: child, heart, women
  • 28.
    No institution will be better than the institutor.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Character," Essays, Second Series (1844). Being a philosopher concerned with the broader implications of education, Emerson was probably making a pun on "tutor" and "institutor."
  • 29.
    We live in succession, in division, in parts, in particles. Meantime within man is the soul of the whole; the wise silence; the universal beauty, to which every particle is equally related; the eternal ONE.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "The Over-Soul," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).

    Read more quotations about / on: silence, beauty
  • 30.
    There is no teaching until the pupil is brought into the same state or principle in which you are; a transfusion takes place; he is you, and you are he; then is a teaching; and by no unfriendly chance or bad company can he ever lose the benefit.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Spiritual Laws," Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).
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