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Quotations From RALPH WALDO EMERSON

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  • 91.
    Literature is the effort of man to indemnify himself for the wrongs of his condition.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. The Dial, vol. 12, 1841. "Walter Savage Landor," The Natural History of Intellect (1893).
  • 92.
    A scholar is a candle which the love and desire of all men will light.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Society and Solitude," Society and Solitude (1870).

    Read more quotations about / on: light, love
  • 93.
    The whole constitution of property on its present tenures, is injurious, and its influence on persons deteriorating and degrading.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Politics," Essays, Second Series (1844).
  • 94.
    Miracle comes to the miraculous, not to the arithmetician.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Worship," The Conduct of Life (1860).
  • 95.
    Nature has made up her mind that what cannot defend itself shall not be defended.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Courage," Society and Solitude (1870).

    Read more quotations about / on: nature
  • 96.
    Whatever events in progress shall disgust men with cities, and infuse into them the passion for country life, and country pleasures, will render a service to the whole face of this continent, and will further the most poetic of all the occupations of real life, the bringing out by art the native but hidden graces of the landscape.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Speech, February 7, 1844, the Mercantile Library Association, Boston, Massachusetts. "The Young American," Nature, Addresses, and Lectures (1849).

    Read more quotations about / on: passion, life
  • 97.
    I wish to speak with all respect of persons, but sometimes I must pinch myself to keep awake, and preserve the due decorum. They melt so fast into each other, that they are like grass and trees, and it needs an effort to treat them as individuals.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Nominalist and Realist," Essays, Second Series (1844).

    Read more quotations about / on: respect, sometimes
  • 98.
    There is this to be said in favor of drinking, that it takes the drunkard first out of society, then out of the world.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. The Journals and Miscellaneous Notebooks of Ralph Waldo Emerson, vol. 16, 1866 entry, eds. Ronald Bosco and Glen Johnson.

    Read more quotations about / on: world
  • 99.
    The world-spirit is a good swimmer, and storms and waves can not drown him. He snaps his fingers at laws; and so, throughout history, heaven seems to affect low and poor means. Through the years and the centuries, through evil agents, through toys and atoms, a great and beneficent tendency irresistibly streams.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. "Montaigne; or, the Skeptic," Representative Men (1850).

    Read more quotations about / on: evil, heaven, history, world
  • 100.
    Character is always known. Thefts never enrich; alms never impoverish; murder will speak out of stone walls.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Address, July 15, 1838, delivered before the senior class in Divinity College, Cambridge. "The Divinity School Address," repr. in The Portable Emerson, ed. Carl Bode (1946, repr. 1981).

    Read more quotations about / on: murder
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