Learn More

Quotations From PIERRE CORNEILLE

» More about Pierre Corneille on Poemhunter

 

  • Be it only for a day, it is still a glory without equal to be master of the world just that day.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Cleopatra, in The Death of Pompey (La Mort de Pompée), act 2, sc. 1 (1642).

    Read more quotations about / on: world
  • Go, I hate you not.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Chimène, in The Cid, act 3, sc. 4 (1637). Chimène declares she still loves Rodrigue, who has killed her father. One of the most famous expressions in Corneille (Va, je ne te hais point), the most cited French example of classical understatement, or litotes (expressing the affirmative by negating its opposite).

    Read more quotations about / on: hate
  • Each instant of life is a step toward death.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Titus, in Titus and Berenice (Tite et Bérénice), act 5, sc. 1 (1670).

    Read more quotations about / on: death, life
  • How sweet to die after one's enemies.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Cleopatra, in Rodogune, act 5, sc. 1 (1644).
  • How delicious is pleasure after torment!
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Clarice, in The Widow (La Veuve), act 3, sc. 8 (1632).
  • To vanquish without peril is to triumph without glory.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. The Count, in The Cid, act 2, sc. 2 (1637).
  • When obedience is so impious, revolt is a necessity.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Séleucus, in Rodogune, act 3, sc. 5 (1644).
  • As for our gods, we have a few too many to be true.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Sevère, in Polyeucte, act 4, sc. 6 (1641). Sevère speaks of the pagan Roman religion.
  • In recounting our woes, we often soothe them.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Stratonice, in Polyeucte, act 1, sc. 3 (1641).
  • Ah, though a Roman, I am not less a man.
    Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Sertorius, in Sertorius, act 4, sc. 1 (1662). Sertorius describes the limits of Roman virtues.
[Hata Bildir]