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Quotations From OSCAR WILDE

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  • 41.
    Nothing makes one so vain as being told that one is a sinner.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 8 (1891).
  • 42.
    The condition of perfection is idleness: the aim of perfection is youth.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Phrases and Philosophies for the Use of the Young, Chameleon (London, December 1894).
  • 43.
    It is only the modern that ever becomes old-fashioned.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Vivian, in The Decay of Lying, Intentions (1891).
  • 44.
    I can't help detesting my relations. I suppose it comes from the fact that none of us can stand other people having the same faults as ourselves.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 1 (1891).

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  • 45.
    A cigarette is the perfect type of a perfect pleasure. It is exquisite, and it leaves one unsatisfied. What more can one want?
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 6 (1891).

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  • 46.
    When liberty comes with hands dabbled in blood it is hard to shake hands with her.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Comment to reporters on the murder in Dublin of the new Irish chief secretary, Lord Frederick Cavendish, by Fenian nationalists, May 1882. Quoted in Richard Ellman, Oscar Wilde, ch. 7 (1987).
  • 47.
    The advantage of the emotions is that they lead us astray.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 3 (1891).
  • 48.
    Formerly we used to canonise our heroes. The modern method is to vulgarise them. Cheap editions of great books may be delightful, but cheap editions of great men are absolutely detestable.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Gilbert, in The Critic as Artist, pt. 1, Intentions (1891).
  • 49.
    Most of our modern portrait painters are doomed to absolute oblivion. They never paint what they see. They paint what the public sees, and the public never sees anything.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Vivian, in The Decay of Lying, published in Intentions (1891).
  • 50.
    Twenty years of romance makes a woman look like a ruin; but twenty years of marriage makes her look like a public building.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. From A Woman of No Importance (1893). Quoted in The Epigrams of Oscar Wilde, ed. Alvin Redman (1952).

    Read more quotations about / on: romance, marriage, woman
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