Quotations From OSCAR WILDE

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  • 91.
    Temperament is the primary requisite for the critic—a temperament exquisitely susceptible to beauty, and to the various impressions that beauty gives us.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Gilbert, in The Critic as Artist, pt. 2, published in Intentions (1891).

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  • 92.
    We who live in prison, and in whose lives there is no event but sorrow, have to measure time by throbs of pain, and the record of bitter moments.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. De Profundis (1905). Wilde himself spent two years in prison.

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  • 93.
    He was always late on principle, his principle being that punctuality is the thief of time.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 4 (1891). Commenting on Lord Henry.

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  • 94.
    To make a good salad is to be a brilliant diplomatist—the problem is entirely the same in both cases. To know exactly how much oil one must put with one's vinegar.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Prince Paul, in Vera, or The Nihilists (1880).
  • 95.
    One can always be kind to people about whom one cares nothing.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 8.

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  • 96.
    One's real life is so often the life that one does not lead.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Rose-Leaf and Apple-Leaf: Envoi.

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  • 97.
    Genius lasts longer than Beauty. That accounts for the fact that we all take such pains to over-educate ourselves.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Grey, ch. 1 (1891).

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  • 98.
    People sometimes inquire what form of government is most suitable for an artist to live under. To this question there is only one answer. The form of government that is most suitable to the artist is no government at all.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. (repr. 1895). "The Soul of Man Under Socialism," Fortnightly Review (London, February 1891).

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  • 99.
    Man is made for something better than disturbing dirt.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. The Soul of Man Under Socialism, Fortnightly Review (London, February 1891, repr. 1895).
  • 100.
    Thinking is the most unhealthy thing in the world, and people die of it just as they die of any other disease. Fortunately, in England at any rate, thought is not catching. Our splendid physique as a people is entirely due to our national stupidity.
    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Vivian, in The Decay of Lying, published in Intentions (1891).

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