Treasure Island

Quotations From MARK TWAIN [SAMUEL LANGHORNE CLEMENS]

» More about Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] on Poemhunter

 

  • 41.
    It takes your enemy and your friend, working together, to hurt you to the heart: the one to slander you and the other to get the news to you.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. Following the Equator, ch. 45, "Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar," (1897).

    Read more quotations about / on: hurt, friend, together, heart
  • 42.
    It could probably be shown by facts and figures that there is no distinctly native American criminal class except Congress.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. Following the Equator, ch. 8, "Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar," (1897).
  • 43.
    The lack of money is the root of all evil.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. "More Maxims of Mark," p. 944, Mark Twain: Collected Tales, Sketches, Speeches, & Essays, 1891-1910, Library of America (1992).

    Read more quotations about / on: evil, money
  • 44.
    I have stopped smoking now and then, for a few months at a time, but it was not on principle, it was only to show off; it was to pulverize those critics who said I was a slave to my habits and couldn't break my bonds.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. "Seventieth Birthday Speech," pp. 715-16, Mark Twain: Collected Tales, Sketches, Speeches, & Essays, 1891-1910, Library of America (1992).

    Read more quotations about / on: time
  • 45.
    If you find that you can't make seventy by any but an uncomfortable road, don't you go. When they take off the Pullman and retire you to the rancid smoker, put off your things, count your checks, and get out at the first way station where there's a cemetery.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. "Seventieth Birthday Speech," p. 715, Mark Twain: Collected Tales, Sketches, Speeches, & Essays, 1891-1910, Library of America (1992).
  • 46.
    Nothing is made in vain, but the fly came near it.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. "More Maxims of Mark," p. 945, Mark Twain: Collected Tales, Sketches, Speeches, & Essays, 1891-1910, Library of America (1992).

    Read more quotations about / on: fly
  • 47.
    I have never taken any exercise, except sleeping and resting, and I never intend to take any. Exercise is loathsome. And it cannot be any benefit when you are tired; and I was always tired.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. "Seventieth Birthday Speech," p. 716, Mark Twain: Collected Tales, Sketches, Speeches, & Essays, 1891-1910, Library of America (1992).
  • 48.
    Music is a good thing; and after all that soul-butter and hogwash, I never see it freshen up things so, and sound so honest and bully.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. Huck, in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, ch. 25 (1885).

    Read more quotations about / on: music
  • 49.
    Tonight I appear for the first time before a Boston audience—4,000 critics.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. letter, Nov. 9, 1869.

    Read more quotations about / on: time
  • 50.
    He is a stranger to me but he is a most remarkable man—and I am the other one. Between us, we cover all knowledge; he knows all that can be known and I know the rest
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. The Autobiography of Mark Twain, ch. 59, ed. Charles Neider, Harper & Row (1959).
[Hata Bildir]