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Quotations From MARK TWAIN [SAMUEL LANGHORNE CLEMENS]

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  • Demagogue—a vessel containing beer and other liquids.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. "Girls," p. 92, Mark Twain's Speeches, Harper and Brothers (1910).
  • Good friends, good books and a sleepy conscience: this is the ideal life.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. "More Maxims of Mark," p. 943, Mark Twain: Collected Tales, Sketches, Speeches, & Essays, 1891-1910, Library of America (1992).

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  • Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence in society.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. "More Maxims of Mark," p. 942, Mark Twain: Collected Tales, Sketches, Speeches, & Essays, 1891-1910, Library of America (1992).

    Read more quotations about / on: people
  • There is nothing you can say in answer to a compliment. I have been complimented myself a great many times, and they always embarrass me—I always feel that they have not said enough.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. speech, Sept. 23, 1907. "Fulton Day, Jamestown," published in Mark Twain's Speeches, ed. Albert Bigelow Paine (1923). Real name is Samuel Langhorne Clemens.
  • Let us be thankful for the fools. But for them the rest of us could not succeed.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. Following the Equator, ch. 28, "Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar," (1897).
  • The report of my death was an exaggeration.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. Originally a response to a newspaper reporter's inquiry about a rumor that Twain was either dead or on his deathbed in London, 1896. Mark Twain's Notebook (1935). This line has been quoted in various ways, more powerfully, I think, as "The report of my death has been greatly exaggerated." Since it was quoted by the newspapers, it is difficult to know what Twain's exact phrasing was when he invented the line.

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  • Truth is stranger than fiction, but it is because Fiction is obliged to stick to possibilities; Truth isn't.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. "Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar," ch. 15, Following the Equator (1897).

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  • Look at the mother of Washington! She raised a boy that could not tell a lie—could not tell a lie! But he never had any chance. It might have been different if he had belonged to the Washington Newspaper Correspondents' Club
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), U.S. author. Speech to the Washington Correspondents' Club. "Woman—an Opinion," Mark Twain's Speeches, ed. William Dean Howells, Harpers (1910).

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